The impact of mild cognitive impairment on the self-regulation process: A comparison study of persons with mild cognitive impairment and cognitively healthy older adults

Evangelos C. Karademas, Panagiotis Simos, Ioannis Zaganas, Sofia Tziraki, Simeon Panagiotakis, Maria Basta, Alexandros N. Vgontzas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined whether mild cognitive impairment affects the associations between personal expectations (i.e. optimism and self-efficacy), illness-related coping, and quality of life. In total, two groups of older adults participated: 127 persons diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment and 225 cognitively healthy older persons (cognitively non-impaired group). Several significant relationships observed in the cognitively non-impaired group did not reach significance among mild cognitive impairment patients, with the opposite trend noted for others (e.g. between palliative coping and physical health). These findings indicate that mild cognitive impairment may lead to problems in the self-regulation process and highlight the significance of the interplay between neurocognitive and psychosocial aspects of self-regulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-361
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

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