The Impact of Self-Service Technology and the Presence of Others on Cause-Related Marketing Programs in Restaurants

Lydia Hanks, Nathan D. Line, Anna S. Mattila

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Self-service technology (SST) is rapidly gaining traction in the restaurant industry, yet the impact on consumer behavior remains to be seen. This study lends a theoretical perspective to the growing issue of SST and its effect on consumer donation behavior. From the lens of costly signaling theory, we examine how the use of SST impacts guest responses to cause-related marketing (CRM) initiatives. Employing an experimental design, we found that customers who were solicited in the presence of others were more likely to donate than those solicited via SST. These results suggest that when the participation decision is conspicuous, donating is a way to raise social status in front of others. To the best of the authors[#x02019] knowledge, no extant research has examined the joint impact of SST and matching donations on the customer[#x02019]s participation in CRM programs. Our findings suggest that SST adoption may have unintended consequences for corporations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)547-562
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Hospitality Marketing and Management
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Management Information Systems
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management
  • Marketing

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