The importance of studying co-offending networks for criminological theory and policy

Jean Marie McGloin, Holly Nguyen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

For nearly a century, criminologists have been well acquainted with the group nature of crime. In the early part of the twentieth century, Shaw and McKay (1942) observed that the vast majority (approximately 80%) of juveniles who were seen in the Cook County Juvenile Court were suspected of committing crimes with accomplices; similar findings have consistently emerged in the decades since with regard to both official records and self-reports, as well as across a wide range of locations (e.g., Carrington, 2002; Sarnecki, 2001; Warr, 2002; cf. Stolzenberg & D’Allesio, 2008). Indeed, Breckinridge and Abbott’s (1912) observation that a delinquent who offends alone is a rarity can, at this point, rightly be called a criminological “fact” (McGloin, Sullivan, Piquero, & Bacon, 2008).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCrime and Networks
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages13-27
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9781134643325
ISBN (Print)9780415644532
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

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