The independence of implicit and explicit attitudes toward physical activity: Introspective access and attitudinal concordance

Amanda L. Hyde, Shawna E. Doerksen, Nuno F. Ribeiro, David E. Conroy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study investigated relations between implicit and explicit attitudes toward physical activity, as well as the role of individual differences in introspective access as a possible moderator of implicit-explicit attitudinal concordance. Design: The design was non-experimental and involved self-report and behavioral measures. Method: Undergraduate students (N=203) completed explicit measures of attitudes toward physical activity and its outcomes. They also completed a Single-Category Implicit Association Test adapted to assess implicit evaluative attitudes toward physical activity. Results: Implicit and explicit attitudes toward physical activity were unrelated and neither private self-consciousness nor private body consciousness moderated the relation. Conclusions: These findings support the theory that implicit and explicit attitudes toward physical activity are independent systems. We discuss the implications of these findings for physical activity promotion efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)387-393
Number of pages7
JournalPsychology of Sport and Exercise
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

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Exercise
Consciousness
Individuality
Self Report
Students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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The independence of implicit and explicit attitudes toward physical activity : Introspective access and attitudinal concordance. / Hyde, Amanda L.; Doerksen, Shawna E.; Ribeiro, Nuno F.; Conroy, David E.

In: Psychology of Sport and Exercise, Vol. 11, No. 5, 01.09.2010, p. 387-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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