The influx of inflammatory cells into nasal washings during the late response to antigen challenge. Effect of systemic steroid pretreatment

R. Bascom, U. Pipkorn, L. M. Lichtenstein, R. M. Naclerio

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Abstract

Previous studies have demonstrated symptoms and mediator release occurring as long as 11 h after nasal challenge with antigen in selected allergic subjects. Pretreatment with systemic steroids reduced symptoms and mediators including histamine, TAME-esterase activity, and kinins. The aims of the present study were to characterize the cell influx during the late-phase response to antigen challenge and to determine the effect of pretreatment with systemic steroids on this response. We examined cytospin slides of nasal washings obtained before and hourly for 11 h after nasal antigen challenge in 10 asymptomatic allergic subjects with a history of seasonal rhinitis and 5 normal, nonallergic subjects. Allergic subjects received oral prednisone (20 mg 3 times a day) or placebo in a random, double-blind crossover manner for 2 days before each of 2 challenges 1 month apart. On placebo days, a mixed cell influx occurred in allegic subjects during the late response that was 50-fold greater than the cell influx in the nonallergic control subjects (p < 0.005). During the first 3 h after antigen challenge, eosinophils (p < 0.005), but not neutrophils or mononuclear cells, were observed. During the late phase (4 to 11 h), neutrophils, eosinophils, and mononuclear cells were all increased. Oral steroid pretreatment blocked the influx of eosinophils (p < 0.005), but not that of other cells. These data demonstrate an inflammatory cell influx associated with the nasal late-phase response and suggest an important pathogenetic role for the eosinophil. The previously observed reduction in mediators during the late response with systemic steroid pretreatment is most likely due to an altered cell influx but may also involve altered inflammatory cell function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)406-412
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Review of Respiratory Disease
Volume138
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

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Nasal Lavage Fluid
Steroids
Antigens
Eosinophils
Nose
Neutrophils
Placebos
Kinins
Rhinitis
Prednisone
Histamine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

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title = "The influx of inflammatory cells into nasal washings during the late response to antigen challenge. Effect of systemic steroid pretreatment",
abstract = "Previous studies have demonstrated symptoms and mediator release occurring as long as 11 h after nasal challenge with antigen in selected allergic subjects. Pretreatment with systemic steroids reduced symptoms and mediators including histamine, TAME-esterase activity, and kinins. The aims of the present study were to characterize the cell influx during the late-phase response to antigen challenge and to determine the effect of pretreatment with systemic steroids on this response. We examined cytospin slides of nasal washings obtained before and hourly for 11 h after nasal antigen challenge in 10 asymptomatic allergic subjects with a history of seasonal rhinitis and 5 normal, nonallergic subjects. Allergic subjects received oral prednisone (20 mg 3 times a day) or placebo in a random, double-blind crossover manner for 2 days before each of 2 challenges 1 month apart. On placebo days, a mixed cell influx occurred in allegic subjects during the late response that was 50-fold greater than the cell influx in the nonallergic control subjects (p < 0.005). During the first 3 h after antigen challenge, eosinophils (p < 0.005), but not neutrophils or mononuclear cells, were observed. During the late phase (4 to 11 h), neutrophils, eosinophils, and mononuclear cells were all increased. Oral steroid pretreatment blocked the influx of eosinophils (p < 0.005), but not that of other cells. These data demonstrate an inflammatory cell influx associated with the nasal late-phase response and suggest an important pathogenetic role for the eosinophil. The previously observed reduction in mediators during the late response with systemic steroid pretreatment is most likely due to an altered cell influx but may also involve altered inflammatory cell function.",
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The influx of inflammatory cells into nasal washings during the late response to antigen challenge. Effect of systemic steroid pretreatment. / Bascom, R.; Pipkorn, U.; Lichtenstein, L. M.; Naclerio, R. M.

In: American Review of Respiratory Disease, Vol. 138, No. 2, 01.01.1988, p. 406-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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