The interplay of news frames on cognitive complexity

Dhavan V. Shah, Nojin Kwak, Mike Schmierbach, Jessica Zubric

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research considers how distinct news frames work in combination to influence information processing. It extends framing research grounded in prospect theory (Tversky & Kahneman, 1981) and attribution theory (Iyengar, 1991) to study conditional framing effects on associative memory. Using a 2 × 3 experimental design embedded within a probability survey (N = 379), tests examined the effects of two different frame dimensions - loss-gain and individual-societal - on the complexity of individuals' thoughts concerning the issue of urban growth. Findings indicate that news frames interact to generate more or less complex cognitive responses, with societal-gain frame combinations generating the most detailed cognitions about the causes, components, and consequences of urban growth. Directions for research on media framing are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-120
Number of pages19
JournalHuman Communication Research
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

Urban growth
news
Research
attribution theory
Growth
Automatic Data Processing
information processing
Design of experiments
Cognition
cognition
Research Design
Data storage equipment
cause
Direction compound
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Anthropology
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Shah, Dhavan V. ; Kwak, Nojin ; Schmierbach, Mike ; Zubric, Jessica. / The interplay of news frames on cognitive complexity. In: Human Communication Research. 2004 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 102-120.
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The interplay of news frames on cognitive complexity. / Shah, Dhavan V.; Kwak, Nojin; Schmierbach, Mike; Zubric, Jessica.

In: Human Communication Research, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 102-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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