The interplay of work and caregiving: Relationships between role satisfaction, role involvement, and caregivers' well-being

Lynn M. Martire, Mary Ann Parris Stephens, Audie A. Atienza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study applied theory from the general work and family literature to the dual roles of work and caregiving, in order to examine whether level of satisfaction and time involvement in each of these roles moderate the effects of stress in the other role on well-being. Respondents were 118 employed women who were providing care to an impaired parent or parent-in-law. As predicted, greater time involvement in work was found to buffer women from the negative effects of caregiving stress. Satisfaction with caregiving and satisfaction with work were directly associated with better well-being, beyond the effects of stress in both roles. However, women who experienced high levels of caregiving stress and who were highly satisfied with work were especially vulnerable to depression. These findings illustrate the importance of examining the effects of caregiving stress on well-being in the context of work-related experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S279-S289
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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