The Interrelationship of Power and Control

Charles C. Manz, Dennis A. Gioia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper addresses the interrelationship of power and control. A model is developed suggesting that (a) control of organizational resources (resource control) is the primary source of interpersonal power; (b) interpersonal power is the driving force for controlling individuals (personal control); the type of power used to exercise personal control will influence the controlled/controller relationship; and (d) personal control fosters resource control and thus affects the distribution of intraorganizational power. Several questions and issues relevant to research and practice are raised. Overall, it is argued that to increase our understanding of power and control, greater effort is needed aimed at uncovering their interdependent relationship rather than the usual independent treatment given these two elusive concepts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-475
Number of pages17
JournalHuman Relations
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1983

Fingerprint

resources
Interrelationship
distribution of power
Controllers
Personal control
Resources
Organizational resources
Driving force
Controller
Exercise
Primary Source
Controlled
Distribution of Power

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Strategy and Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

Manz, Charles C. ; Gioia, Dennis A. / The Interrelationship of Power and Control. In: Human Relations. 1983 ; Vol. 36, No. 5. pp. 459-475.
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The Interrelationship of Power and Control. / Manz, Charles C.; Gioia, Dennis A.

In: Human Relations, Vol. 36, No. 5, 05.1983, p. 459-475.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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