The long arm of adolescence: School health behavioral environments, tobacco and alcohol co-use, and the 5HTTLPR gene

Jonathan Kyle Daw, Jason D. Boardman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although sociologists, demographers, and others have thoroughly studied contextual and life course influences on tobacco and alcohol use in adolescence and young adulthood, far less attention has been paid to the determinants of tobacco and alcohol co-use. This is important to remedy because co-use has a nonadditive effect on long-term health. In this article, we use nationally representative, longitudinal data from adolescents and young adults to examine patterns of joint tobacco and alcohol use behaviors across the life course. Importantly, we describe how these trajectories are linked to respondents high schools joint profile of tobacco and alcohol use, measured two ways: as the proportion of tobacco and alcohol co-users, and as the "excess proportion" above that expected based on the marginal probabilities of smoking and drinking in that school. Joint tobacco and alcohol use is associated with both measures, emphasizing the "long arm" of adolescent contexts. Furthermore, we extend previous research to assess whether there is a gene-environment interaction between this school-level measure, 5HTTLPR, and tobacco and alcohol co-use, as suggested by recent work analyzing drinking and smoking separately. We find evidence of such a pattern but conclude that it is likely to be due to population stratification or other forms of confounding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-136
Number of pages20
JournalBiodemography and Social Biology
Volume60
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2014

Fingerprint

adolescence
School Health Services
tobacco
nicotine
Tobacco
alcohol
alcohols
Alcohols
Tobacco Use
gene
health
school
Genes
genes
Joints
drinking
smoking
young adults
Drinking
sociologists

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Anthropology
  • Genetics

Cite this

@article{24eb91e0cb674ee88b2bc65a0c8cf7a5,
title = "The long arm of adolescence: School health behavioral environments, tobacco and alcohol co-use, and the 5HTTLPR gene",
abstract = "Although sociologists, demographers, and others have thoroughly studied contextual and life course influences on tobacco and alcohol use in adolescence and young adulthood, far less attention has been paid to the determinants of tobacco and alcohol co-use. This is important to remedy because co-use has a nonadditive effect on long-term health. In this article, we use nationally representative, longitudinal data from adolescents and young adults to examine patterns of joint tobacco and alcohol use behaviors across the life course. Importantly, we describe how these trajectories are linked to respondents high schools joint profile of tobacco and alcohol use, measured two ways: as the proportion of tobacco and alcohol co-users, and as the {"}excess proportion{"} above that expected based on the marginal probabilities of smoking and drinking in that school. Joint tobacco and alcohol use is associated with both measures, emphasizing the {"}long arm{"} of adolescent contexts. Furthermore, we extend previous research to assess whether there is a gene-environment interaction between this school-level measure, 5HTTLPR, and tobacco and alcohol co-use, as suggested by recent work analyzing drinking and smoking separately. We find evidence of such a pattern but conclude that it is likely to be due to population stratification or other forms of confounding.",
author = "Daw, {Jonathan Kyle} and Boardman, {Jason D.}",
year = "2014",
month = "7",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1080/19485565.2014.946590",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "60",
pages = "117--136",
journal = "Biodemography and Social Biology",
issn = "1948-5565",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

The long arm of adolescence : School health behavioral environments, tobacco and alcohol co-use, and the 5HTTLPR gene. / Daw, Jonathan Kyle; Boardman, Jason D.

In: Biodemography and Social Biology, Vol. 60, No. 2, 03.07.2014, p. 117-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The long arm of adolescence

T2 - School health behavioral environments, tobacco and alcohol co-use, and the 5HTTLPR gene

AU - Daw, Jonathan Kyle

AU - Boardman, Jason D.

PY - 2014/7/3

Y1 - 2014/7/3

N2 - Although sociologists, demographers, and others have thoroughly studied contextual and life course influences on tobacco and alcohol use in adolescence and young adulthood, far less attention has been paid to the determinants of tobacco and alcohol co-use. This is important to remedy because co-use has a nonadditive effect on long-term health. In this article, we use nationally representative, longitudinal data from adolescents and young adults to examine patterns of joint tobacco and alcohol use behaviors across the life course. Importantly, we describe how these trajectories are linked to respondents high schools joint profile of tobacco and alcohol use, measured two ways: as the proportion of tobacco and alcohol co-users, and as the "excess proportion" above that expected based on the marginal probabilities of smoking and drinking in that school. Joint tobacco and alcohol use is associated with both measures, emphasizing the "long arm" of adolescent contexts. Furthermore, we extend previous research to assess whether there is a gene-environment interaction between this school-level measure, 5HTTLPR, and tobacco and alcohol co-use, as suggested by recent work analyzing drinking and smoking separately. We find evidence of such a pattern but conclude that it is likely to be due to population stratification or other forms of confounding.

AB - Although sociologists, demographers, and others have thoroughly studied contextual and life course influences on tobacco and alcohol use in adolescence and young adulthood, far less attention has been paid to the determinants of tobacco and alcohol co-use. This is important to remedy because co-use has a nonadditive effect on long-term health. In this article, we use nationally representative, longitudinal data from adolescents and young adults to examine patterns of joint tobacco and alcohol use behaviors across the life course. Importantly, we describe how these trajectories are linked to respondents high schools joint profile of tobacco and alcohol use, measured two ways: as the proportion of tobacco and alcohol co-users, and as the "excess proportion" above that expected based on the marginal probabilities of smoking and drinking in that school. Joint tobacco and alcohol use is associated with both measures, emphasizing the "long arm" of adolescent contexts. Furthermore, we extend previous research to assess whether there is a gene-environment interaction between this school-level measure, 5HTTLPR, and tobacco and alcohol co-use, as suggested by recent work analyzing drinking and smoking separately. We find evidence of such a pattern but conclude that it is likely to be due to population stratification or other forms of confounding.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84908491926&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84908491926&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/19485565.2014.946590

DO - 10.1080/19485565.2014.946590

M3 - Article

C2 - 25343362

AN - SCOPUS:84908491926

VL - 60

SP - 117

EP - 136

JO - Biodemography and Social Biology

JF - Biodemography and Social Biology

SN - 1948-5565

IS - 2

ER -