The Long Arm of Poverty: Extended and Relational Geographies of Child Victimization and Neighborhood Violence Exposures

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Current models of neighborhood effects on victimization predominantly assume that residential neighborhoods function independent of their surroundings. Yet, a surprising proportion of violence occurs outside of victims’ residential neighborhoods. The current study extends on recent advances in spatial dynamics and neighborhood effects to explore the importance of different geographic scales and relational exposures to poverty for child violent victimization. We examine longitudinal data on over 4400 low-income children from high poverty neighborhoods in five cities, who participated in the Moving to Opportunity randomized intervention. The results suggest that surrounding poverty matters for child victimization beyond the effect of residential poverty. Moreover, moving farther from extreme poverty also seems to buffer against victimization and to amplify the benefits of moving to improved extended (residential and surrounding) neighborhoods. All the children in the study, but especially boys older than 10 years of age, seemed to be affected by the long arm of poverty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1096-1125
Number of pages30
JournalJustice Quarterly
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 19 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

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