“The lunchroom is dirty and the food is nasty”: Ethical dilemmas in conducting qualitative food studies research in detroit and New York City Public Schools

Sophia Rodriguez, John Lupinacci, Kristen Goessling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this article, reflecting critically on past school food studies and considering the landscape of qualitative methods, notably youth participatory action research methodologies, the authors share methodological suggestions for centering social justice and sustainability with the lived experience of youth by drawing on their critical qualitative research in Detroit and New York City public schools. We advance an analytic framework that aims to center youth voices and solutions to social problems such as food justice and equity. To this end we call for attention to human rights, youth participatory research, and relational ethics as part of our intention to center youth voices. Furthermore, the article emphasizes how this critical research with urban communities, ought to, and can, directly involve young people in schools together with their teachers and school leaders working and learning to take actions in support of the health, strength, and sustainability of their communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2225-2243
Number of pages19
JournalQualitative Report
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Education

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