The MAL-ED cohort study: Methods and lessons learned when assessing early child development and caregiving mediators in infants and young children in 8 low-and middle-income countries

MAL-ED Network Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

More epidemiological data are needed on risk and protective factors for child development. In The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study, we assessed child development in a harmonious manner across 8 sites in Bangladesh, Brazil, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Peru, South Africa, and Tanzania. From birth to 24 months, development and language acquisition were assessed via the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development and a modified MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory. Other measures were infant temperament, the child's environment, maternal psychological adjustment, and maternal reasoning abilities. We developed standard operating procedures and used multiple techniques to ensure appropriate adaptation and quality assurance across the sites. Test adaptation required significant time and human resources but is essential for data quality; funders should support this step in future studies. At the end of this study, we will have a portfolio of culturally adapted instruments for child development studies with examination of psychometric properties of each tool used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S261-S272
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume59
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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Child Development
Cohort Studies
Mothers
Nepal
Language Development
Peru
Aptitude
Temperament
Bangladesh
Tanzania
Pakistan
South Africa
Psychometrics
Malnutrition
Brazil
India
Parturition
Equipment and Supplies
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

@article{979dbaee7f9d41c8be3a67f0464b1594,
title = "The MAL-ED cohort study: Methods and lessons learned when assessing early child development and caregiving mediators in infants and young children in 8 low-and middle-income countries",
abstract = "More epidemiological data are needed on risk and protective factors for child development. In The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study, we assessed child development in a harmonious manner across 8 sites in Bangladesh, Brazil, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Peru, South Africa, and Tanzania. From birth to 24 months, development and language acquisition were assessed via the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development and a modified MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory. Other measures were infant temperament, the child's environment, maternal psychological adjustment, and maternal reasoning abilities. We developed standard operating procedures and used multiple techniques to ensure appropriate adaptation and quality assurance across the sites. Test adaptation required significant time and human resources but is essential for data quality; funders should support this step in future studies. At the end of this study, we will have a portfolio of culturally adapted instruments for child development studies with examination of psychometric properties of each tool used.",
author = "{MAL-ED Network Investigators} and Murray-Kolb, {Laura E.} and Rasmussen, {Zeba A.} and Scharf, {Rebecca J.} and Rasheed, {Muneera A.} and Erling Svensen and Seidman, {Jessica C.} and Fahmida Tofail and Beena Koshy and Rita Shrestha and Angelina Maphula and Vasquez, {Angel Orbe} and {Da Costa}, {Hilda P.} and Yousafzai, {Aisha K.} and Oria, {Reinaldo B.} and Reeba Roshan and Bayyo, {Eliwasa B.} and Margaret Kosek and Sanjaya Shrestha and Schaefer, {Barbara A.} and Pascal Bessong and Tahmeed Ahmed and Dennis Lang and Acosta, {Angel Mendez} and {de Burga}, {Rosa Rios} and Chavez, {Cesar Banda} and Flores, {Julian Torres} and Olotegui, {Maribel Paredes} and Pinedo, {Silvia Rengifo} and Salas, {Mery Siguas} and Trigoso, {Dixner Rengifo} and Vasquez, {Angel Orbe} and Imran Ahmed and Didar Alam and Asad Ali and Bhutta, {Zulfiqar A.} and Shahida Qureshi and Muneera Rasheed and Sajid Soofi and Ali Turab and Zaidi, {Anita K.M.} and Ladaporn Bodhidatta and Mason, {Carl J.} and Sudhir Babji and Anuradha Bose and George, {Ajila T.} and Dinesh Hariraju and Jennifer, {M. Steffi} and Sushil John and Shiny Kaki and Gagandeep Kang",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/cid/ciu437",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "59",
pages = "S261--S272",
journal = "Clinical Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1058-4838",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The MAL-ED cohort study

T2 - Methods and lessons learned when assessing early child development and caregiving mediators in infants and young children in 8 low-and middle-income countries

AU - MAL-ED Network Investigators

AU - Murray-Kolb, Laura E.

AU - Rasmussen, Zeba A.

AU - Scharf, Rebecca J.

AU - Rasheed, Muneera A.

AU - Svensen, Erling

AU - Seidman, Jessica C.

AU - Tofail, Fahmida

AU - Koshy, Beena

AU - Shrestha, Rita

AU - Maphula, Angelina

AU - Vasquez, Angel Orbe

AU - Da Costa, Hilda P.

AU - Yousafzai, Aisha K.

AU - Oria, Reinaldo B.

AU - Roshan, Reeba

AU - Bayyo, Eliwasa B.

AU - Kosek, Margaret

AU - Shrestha, Sanjaya

AU - Schaefer, Barbara A.

AU - Bessong, Pascal

AU - Ahmed, Tahmeed

AU - Lang, Dennis

AU - Acosta, Angel Mendez

AU - de Burga, Rosa Rios

AU - Chavez, Cesar Banda

AU - Flores, Julian Torres

AU - Olotegui, Maribel Paredes

AU - Pinedo, Silvia Rengifo

AU - Salas, Mery Siguas

AU - Trigoso, Dixner Rengifo

AU - Vasquez, Angel Orbe

AU - Ahmed, Imran

AU - Alam, Didar

AU - Ali, Asad

AU - Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.

AU - Qureshi, Shahida

AU - Rasheed, Muneera

AU - Soofi, Sajid

AU - Turab, Ali

AU - Zaidi, Anita K.M.

AU - Bodhidatta, Ladaporn

AU - Mason, Carl J.

AU - Babji, Sudhir

AU - Bose, Anuradha

AU - George, Ajila T.

AU - Hariraju, Dinesh

AU - Jennifer, M. Steffi

AU - John, Sushil

AU - Kaki, Shiny

AU - Kang, Gagandeep

PY - 2014/11/1

Y1 - 2014/11/1

N2 - More epidemiological data are needed on risk and protective factors for child development. In The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study, we assessed child development in a harmonious manner across 8 sites in Bangladesh, Brazil, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Peru, South Africa, and Tanzania. From birth to 24 months, development and language acquisition were assessed via the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development and a modified MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory. Other measures were infant temperament, the child's environment, maternal psychological adjustment, and maternal reasoning abilities. We developed standard operating procedures and used multiple techniques to ensure appropriate adaptation and quality assurance across the sites. Test adaptation required significant time and human resources but is essential for data quality; funders should support this step in future studies. At the end of this study, we will have a portfolio of culturally adapted instruments for child development studies with examination of psychometric properties of each tool used.

AB - More epidemiological data are needed on risk and protective factors for child development. In The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study, we assessed child development in a harmonious manner across 8 sites in Bangladesh, Brazil, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Peru, South Africa, and Tanzania. From birth to 24 months, development and language acquisition were assessed via the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development and a modified MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory. Other measures were infant temperament, the child's environment, maternal psychological adjustment, and maternal reasoning abilities. We developed standard operating procedures and used multiple techniques to ensure appropriate adaptation and quality assurance across the sites. Test adaptation required significant time and human resources but is essential for data quality; funders should support this step in future studies. At the end of this study, we will have a portfolio of culturally adapted instruments for child development studies with examination of psychometric properties of each tool used.

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U2 - 10.1093/cid/ciu437

DO - 10.1093/cid/ciu437

M3 - Article

C2 - 25305296

AN - SCOPUS:84913543687

VL - 59

SP - S261-S272

JO - Clinical Infectious Diseases

JF - Clinical Infectious Diseases

SN - 1058-4838

ER -