The management of severe subaortic stenosis, ventricular septal defect, and aortic arch obstruction in the neonate

E. L. Bove, L. L. Minich, A. K. Pridjian, F. M. Lupinetti, A. R. Snider, M. Dick, R. H. Beekman, C. I. Tchervenkov, D. R. Metras, John Myers

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Abstract

Neonates with ventricular septal defect and aortic arch obstruction frequently have subaortic stenosis resulting from posterior deviation of the infundibular septum. Because the aortic anulus is often hypoplastic, making direct resection of the infundibular septum through the standard transaortic approach difficult, the optimal method of repair is uncertain. From September 1989 through November 1991, seven patients with ventricular septal defect, coarctation (n = 4), or interrupted aortic arch (n = 3) and severe subaortic stenosis underwent repair with use of a technique that included transatrial resection of the infundibular septum. Their ages ranged from 5 to 63 days (median 15 days) and weights from 1.3 to 5.4 kg (mean 3.1 kg). Only one patient was older than 1 month. The systolic and diastolic ratios of the diameter of the left ventricular outflow tract to that of the descending aorta were 0.53 ± 0.09 mm (standard deviation) and 0.73 ± 0.11, respectively. At operation, the posteriorly displaced infundibular septum was partially removed through a right atrial approach by resecting the superior margin of the ventricular septal defect up to the aortic anulus. The resulting enlarged ventricular septal defect was then closed with a patch to widen the subaortic area. In each patient the aortic arch was repaired by direct anastomosis. All patients survived operation; there was one late death from noncardiac causes 3 months after repair. The survivors remain well from 3 to 14 months after repair (mean 8 months). All are in sinus rhythm and none has a residual ventricular septal defect. One patient underwent successful balloon dilation of a residual aortic arch gradient late after repair. No patient has significant residual subaortic stenosis, although one has valvular aortic stenosis. This series suggests that in neonates with ventricular septal defect and severe subaortic stenosis resulting from posterior deviation of the infundibular septum, direct relief can be satisfactorily accomplished from a right atrial approach. This method provides effective widening of the left ventricular outflow tract and is superior to palliative techniques or conduit procedures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-296
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume105
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1993

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Ventricular Heart Septal Defects
Thoracic Aorta
Pathologic Constriction
Newborn Infant
Aortic Valve Stenosis
Survivors
Dilatation
Cause of Death
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Bove, E. L. ; Minich, L. L. ; Pridjian, A. K. ; Lupinetti, F. M. ; Snider, A. R. ; Dick, M. ; Beekman, R. H. ; Tchervenkov, C. I. ; Metras, D. R. ; Myers, John. / The management of severe subaortic stenosis, ventricular septal defect, and aortic arch obstruction in the neonate. In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 1993 ; Vol. 105, No. 2. pp. 289-296.
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abstract = "Neonates with ventricular septal defect and aortic arch obstruction frequently have subaortic stenosis resulting from posterior deviation of the infundibular septum. Because the aortic anulus is often hypoplastic, making direct resection of the infundibular septum through the standard transaortic approach difficult, the optimal method of repair is uncertain. From September 1989 through November 1991, seven patients with ventricular septal defect, coarctation (n = 4), or interrupted aortic arch (n = 3) and severe subaortic stenosis underwent repair with use of a technique that included transatrial resection of the infundibular septum. Their ages ranged from 5 to 63 days (median 15 days) and weights from 1.3 to 5.4 kg (mean 3.1 kg). Only one patient was older than 1 month. The systolic and diastolic ratios of the diameter of the left ventricular outflow tract to that of the descending aorta were 0.53 ± 0.09 mm (standard deviation) and 0.73 ± 0.11, respectively. At operation, the posteriorly displaced infundibular septum was partially removed through a right atrial approach by resecting the superior margin of the ventricular septal defect up to the aortic anulus. The resulting enlarged ventricular septal defect was then closed with a patch to widen the subaortic area. In each patient the aortic arch was repaired by direct anastomosis. All patients survived operation; there was one late death from noncardiac causes 3 months after repair. The survivors remain well from 3 to 14 months after repair (mean 8 months). All are in sinus rhythm and none has a residual ventricular septal defect. One patient underwent successful balloon dilation of a residual aortic arch gradient late after repair. No patient has significant residual subaortic stenosis, although one has valvular aortic stenosis. This series suggests that in neonates with ventricular septal defect and severe subaortic stenosis resulting from posterior deviation of the infundibular septum, direct relief can be satisfactorily accomplished from a right atrial approach. This method provides effective widening of the left ventricular outflow tract and is superior to palliative techniques or conduit procedures.",
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Bove, EL, Minich, LL, Pridjian, AK, Lupinetti, FM, Snider, AR, Dick, M, Beekman, RH, Tchervenkov, CI, Metras, DR & Myers, J 1993, 'The management of severe subaortic stenosis, ventricular septal defect, and aortic arch obstruction in the neonate', Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, vol. 105, no. 2, pp. 289-296.

The management of severe subaortic stenosis, ventricular septal defect, and aortic arch obstruction in the neonate. / Bove, E. L.; Minich, L. L.; Pridjian, A. K.; Lupinetti, F. M.; Snider, A. R.; Dick, M.; Beekman, R. H.; Tchervenkov, C. I.; Metras, D. R.; Myers, John.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 105, No. 2, 1993, p. 289-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - The management of severe subaortic stenosis, ventricular septal defect, and aortic arch obstruction in the neonate

AU - Bove, E. L.

AU - Minich, L. L.

AU - Pridjian, A. K.

AU - Lupinetti, F. M.

AU - Snider, A. R.

AU - Dick, M.

AU - Beekman, R. H.

AU - Tchervenkov, C. I.

AU - Metras, D. R.

AU - Myers, John

PY - 1993

Y1 - 1993

N2 - Neonates with ventricular septal defect and aortic arch obstruction frequently have subaortic stenosis resulting from posterior deviation of the infundibular septum. Because the aortic anulus is often hypoplastic, making direct resection of the infundibular septum through the standard transaortic approach difficult, the optimal method of repair is uncertain. From September 1989 through November 1991, seven patients with ventricular septal defect, coarctation (n = 4), or interrupted aortic arch (n = 3) and severe subaortic stenosis underwent repair with use of a technique that included transatrial resection of the infundibular septum. Their ages ranged from 5 to 63 days (median 15 days) and weights from 1.3 to 5.4 kg (mean 3.1 kg). Only one patient was older than 1 month. The systolic and diastolic ratios of the diameter of the left ventricular outflow tract to that of the descending aorta were 0.53 ± 0.09 mm (standard deviation) and 0.73 ± 0.11, respectively. At operation, the posteriorly displaced infundibular septum was partially removed through a right atrial approach by resecting the superior margin of the ventricular septal defect up to the aortic anulus. The resulting enlarged ventricular septal defect was then closed with a patch to widen the subaortic area. In each patient the aortic arch was repaired by direct anastomosis. All patients survived operation; there was one late death from noncardiac causes 3 months after repair. The survivors remain well from 3 to 14 months after repair (mean 8 months). All are in sinus rhythm and none has a residual ventricular septal defect. One patient underwent successful balloon dilation of a residual aortic arch gradient late after repair. No patient has significant residual subaortic stenosis, although one has valvular aortic stenosis. This series suggests that in neonates with ventricular septal defect and severe subaortic stenosis resulting from posterior deviation of the infundibular septum, direct relief can be satisfactorily accomplished from a right atrial approach. This method provides effective widening of the left ventricular outflow tract and is superior to palliative techniques or conduit procedures.

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