The medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control (ABC) trial: A multi-site randomized controlled trial in a hypertensive, multi-cultural, economically disadvantaged population

William Gerin, Jonathan N. Tobin, Joseph E. Schwartz, William Chaplin, Nina Rieckmann, Karina W. Davidson, Tanya M. Goyal, Juhee Jhalani, Andrea Cassells, Karina Feliz, Chamanara Khalida, Marleny Diaz-Gloster, Gbenga Ogedegbe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The Medication Adherence and BP Control Trial (ABC Trial) is a randomized, controlled, multi-site, medication adherence and blood pressure (BP) control trial in an economically disadvantaged and multi-cultural population of hypertensive patients followed in primary care practices. To date, no other such trial has been published in which objective measures of adherence (electronic pill bottles) were used to assess the effectiveness of these behavioral interventions for hypertension. This study tested a combination of commercially-available interventions that can be easily accessed by health care providers and patients, and therefore may provide a real-world solution to the problem of non-adherence among hypertensives. The aim of the ABC Trial was to test the effectiveness of a stepped care intervention in improving both medication adherence to an antihypertensive medication regimen and BP control. Step 1 of the intervention employed home Self-BP Monitoring (SBPM); at this stage, there were two arms: (1) Usual Care (UC) and (2) Intervention. At Step 2, patients in the intervention arm whose BP had not come under control after 3 months were further randomized to one of two conditions: (1) continuation of SBPM (alone) or (2) continuation of SBPM plus telephone-based nurse case management (SBPM + NCM). Electronic Medication Event Monitoring (MEMS) was the primary measure of medication adherence, and in-office BP was the primary measure of hypertension control. We present an overview of the study design, details of the administrative structure of the study and a description of clinical site recruitment, patient recruitment, and follow-up assessments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-471
Number of pages13
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

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Medication Adherence
Vulnerable Populations
Randomized Controlled Trials
Blood Pressure
Population
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Micro-Electrical-Mechanical Systems
Hypertension
Case Management
Telephone
Health Personnel
Patient Selection
Antihypertensive Agents
Primary Health Care
Nurses

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Gerin, William ; Tobin, Jonathan N. ; Schwartz, Joseph E. ; Chaplin, William ; Rieckmann, Nina ; Davidson, Karina W. ; Goyal, Tanya M. ; Jhalani, Juhee ; Cassells, Andrea ; Feliz, Karina ; Khalida, Chamanara ; Diaz-Gloster, Marleny ; Ogedegbe, Gbenga. / The medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control (ABC) trial : A multi-site randomized controlled trial in a hypertensive, multi-cultural, economically disadvantaged population. In: Contemporary Clinical Trials. 2007 ; Vol. 28, No. 4. pp. 459-471.
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abstract = "The Medication Adherence and BP Control Trial (ABC Trial) is a randomized, controlled, multi-site, medication adherence and blood pressure (BP) control trial in an economically disadvantaged and multi-cultural population of hypertensive patients followed in primary care practices. To date, no other such trial has been published in which objective measures of adherence (electronic pill bottles) were used to assess the effectiveness of these behavioral interventions for hypertension. This study tested a combination of commercially-available interventions that can be easily accessed by health care providers and patients, and therefore may provide a real-world solution to the problem of non-adherence among hypertensives. The aim of the ABC Trial was to test the effectiveness of a stepped care intervention in improving both medication adherence to an antihypertensive medication regimen and BP control. Step 1 of the intervention employed home Self-BP Monitoring (SBPM); at this stage, there were two arms: (1) Usual Care (UC) and (2) Intervention. At Step 2, patients in the intervention arm whose BP had not come under control after 3 months were further randomized to one of two conditions: (1) continuation of SBPM (alone) or (2) continuation of SBPM plus telephone-based nurse case management (SBPM + NCM). Electronic Medication Event Monitoring (MEMS) was the primary measure of medication adherence, and in-office BP was the primary measure of hypertension control. We present an overview of the study design, details of the administrative structure of the study and a description of clinical site recruitment, patient recruitment, and follow-up assessments.",
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Gerin, W, Tobin, JN, Schwartz, JE, Chaplin, W, Rieckmann, N, Davidson, KW, Goyal, TM, Jhalani, J, Cassells, A, Feliz, K, Khalida, C, Diaz-Gloster, M & Ogedegbe, G 2007, 'The medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control (ABC) trial: A multi-site randomized controlled trial in a hypertensive, multi-cultural, economically disadvantaged population', Contemporary Clinical Trials, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 459-471. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2007.01.003

The medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control (ABC) trial : A multi-site randomized controlled trial in a hypertensive, multi-cultural, economically disadvantaged population. / Gerin, William; Tobin, Jonathan N.; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Chaplin, William; Rieckmann, Nina; Davidson, Karina W.; Goyal, Tanya M.; Jhalani, Juhee; Cassells, Andrea; Feliz, Karina; Khalida, Chamanara; Diaz-Gloster, Marleny; Ogedegbe, Gbenga.

In: Contemporary Clinical Trials, Vol. 28, No. 4, 01.07.2007, p. 459-471.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Davidson, Karina W.

AU - Goyal, Tanya M.

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AU - Cassells, Andrea

AU - Feliz, Karina

AU - Khalida, Chamanara

AU - Diaz-Gloster, Marleny

AU - Ogedegbe, Gbenga

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