The Myth of Gender Cultures: Similarities Outweigh Differences in Men's and Women's Provision of and Responses to Supportive Communication

Erina Lynne Macgeorge, Angela R. Graves, Bo Feng, Seth J. Gillihan, Brant R. Burleson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Scopus citations

Abstract

Michaud and Warner (1997) and Basow and Rubenfeld (2003) recently reported studies of gender differences in "troubles talk" that allegedly provide support for the different cultures thesis, that is, the notion that men and women communicate in such different ways that they should be regarded as members of different communication cultures or speech communities. In this article, we identify several limitations in these two studies that, collectively, have the effect of casting doubt on their conclusions. We then report three studies that show that men and women provide and respond to supportive messages ("troubles talk") in ways that are much more similar than different. The current findings, in conjunction with other recent findings, suggest that the different cultures thesis is a myth that should be discarded.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-175
Number of pages33
JournalSex Roles
Volume50
Issue number3-4
StatePublished - Feb 1 2004

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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