The new federalism and the paradoxes of regional sovereignty in Russia

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During the 1990s Russia appeared to be a classic example of the perils of federalism in political transition. Powerful ethnically based republics challenged the center on key reforms, and a weak federal government appeared unable to counter their claims to sovereignty. Since the election of 2000, however, regional prerogatives have been substantially curtailed. An assertive center has dramatically reined in much more pliant republics. How could the center roll back the regions' privileges so quickly? In fact, republic sovereignty was seriously limited. Federal authorities retained key controls over local resources, and federal inability to create effective market institutions constrained regional opportunities to develop countervailing external ties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalComparative Politics
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

federalism
sovereignty
republic
Russia
federal authority
Federal Government
privilege
election
reform
market
resources

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

@article{a8ebc0e5843c44949613b9d4a8256a4e,
title = "The new federalism and the paradoxes of regional sovereignty in Russia",
abstract = "During the 1990s Russia appeared to be a classic example of the perils of federalism in political transition. Powerful ethnically based republics challenged the center on key reforms, and a weak federal government appeared unable to counter their claims to sovereignty. Since the election of 2000, however, regional prerogatives have been substantially curtailed. An assertive center has dramatically reined in much more pliant republics. How could the center roll back the regions' privileges so quickly? In fact, republic sovereignty was seriously limited. Federal authorities retained key controls over local resources, and federal inability to create effective market institutions constrained regional opportunities to develop countervailing external ties.",
author = "Bahry, {Donna L.}",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2307/20072879",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
journal = "Comparative Politics",
issn = "0010-4159",
publisher = "City University of New York",
number = "2",

}

The new federalism and the paradoxes of regional sovereignty in Russia. / Bahry, Donna L.

In: Comparative Politics, Vol. 37, No. 2, 01.01.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - The new federalism and the paradoxes of regional sovereignty in Russia

AU - Bahry, Donna L.

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - During the 1990s Russia appeared to be a classic example of the perils of federalism in political transition. Powerful ethnically based republics challenged the center on key reforms, and a weak federal government appeared unable to counter their claims to sovereignty. Since the election of 2000, however, regional prerogatives have been substantially curtailed. An assertive center has dramatically reined in much more pliant republics. How could the center roll back the regions' privileges so quickly? In fact, republic sovereignty was seriously limited. Federal authorities retained key controls over local resources, and federal inability to create effective market institutions constrained regional opportunities to develop countervailing external ties.

AB - During the 1990s Russia appeared to be a classic example of the perils of federalism in political transition. Powerful ethnically based republics challenged the center on key reforms, and a weak federal government appeared unable to counter their claims to sovereignty. Since the election of 2000, however, regional prerogatives have been substantially curtailed. An assertive center has dramatically reined in much more pliant republics. How could the center roll back the regions' privileges so quickly? In fact, republic sovereignty was seriously limited. Federal authorities retained key controls over local resources, and federal inability to create effective market institutions constrained regional opportunities to develop countervailing external ties.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=13644265151&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=13644265151&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2307/20072879

DO - 10.2307/20072879

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:13644265151

VL - 37

JO - Comparative Politics

JF - Comparative Politics

SN - 0010-4159

IS - 2

ER -