The new hackers

Historiography through disconnection

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This response characterizes each of the articles in this special issue as instances of “hacking”—which is to say they create new historiographical approaches by getting inside established modes and subjects of rhetorical history, finding and exploiting their incongruities or vulnerabilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-125
Number of pages7
JournalAdvances in the History of Rhetoric
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

hacker
historiography
vulnerability
history
Rhetoric
Vulnerability
Incongruity
Historiography
History

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

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title = "The new hackers: Historiography through disconnection",
abstract = "This response characterizes each of the articles in this special issue as instances of “hacking”—which is to say they create new historiographical approaches by getting inside established modes and subjects of rhetorical history, finding and exploiting their incongruities or vulnerabilities.",
author = "Debra Hawhee",
year = "2012",
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language = "English (US)",
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}

The new hackers : Historiography through disconnection. / Hawhee, Debra.

In: Advances in the History of Rhetoric, Vol. 15, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 119-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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