The O*Net jobs classification system: A primer for family researchers

Ann C. Crouler, Stephanie Trea Lanza, Amy Pirretti, W. Benjamin Goodman, Eloise Neebe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We introduce family researchers to the Occupational Information Network, or O*Net, an electronic data-base on the work characteristics of over 950 occupations. The paper here is a practical primer that covers data collection, selecting occupational characteristics, coding occupations, scale creation, and construct validity, with empirical illustrations from the Family Life Project, a study of almost 1,300 families with infants born in 6 low-income, nonmetro counties in North Carolina and Pennsylvania. We factor analyzed parents' occupations on 35 O*Net characteristics and identified 5 factors: occupational self-direction, physical hazards, physical activity, care work, and automation/repetition, variables that supplement data collected from parents directly. Applied researchers can use the O*Net to expand their knowledge of participants' work circumstances with objective data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-472
Number of pages12
JournalFamily Relations
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006

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Occupations
occupation
Research Personnel
parents
Parents
Information Services
Automation
construct validity
automation
supplement
coding
infant
low income
electronics
Databases
Exercise

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Crouler, Ann C. ; Lanza, Stephanie Trea ; Pirretti, Amy ; Goodman, W. Benjamin ; Neebe, Eloise. / The O*Net jobs classification system : A primer for family researchers. In: Family Relations. 2006 ; Vol. 55, No. 4. pp. 461-472.
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The O*Net jobs classification system : A primer for family researchers. / Crouler, Ann C.; Lanza, Stephanie Trea; Pirretti, Amy; Goodman, W. Benjamin; Neebe, Eloise.

In: Family Relations, Vol. 55, No. 4, 01.10.2006, p. 461-472.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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