“The Only Thing I Wish I Could Change Is That They Treat Us Like People and Not Like Animals”: Injury and Discrimination Among Latino Farmworkers

Shedra Amy Snipes, Sharon P. Cooper, Eva M. Shipp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This article describes how perceived discrimination shapes the way Latino farmworkers encounter injuries and seek out treatment. Methods: After 5 months of ethnographic fieldwork, 89 open-ended, semistructured interviews were analyzed. NVivo was used to code and qualitatively organize the interviews and field notes. Finally, codes, notes, and co-occurring dynamics were used to iteratively assess the data for major themes. Results: The primary source of perceived discrimination was the “boss” or farm owner. Immigrant status was also a significant influence on how farmworkers perceived the discrimination. Specifically, the ability to speak English and length of stay in the United States were related to stronger perceptions of discrimination. Finally, farm owners compelled their Latino employees to work through their injuries without treatment. Conclusions: This ethnographic account brings attention to how discrimination and lack of worksite protections are implicated in farmworkers’ injury experiences and suggests the need for policies that better safeguard vulnerable workers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-46
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Agromedicine
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2017

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Hispanic Americans
Wounds and Injuries
Interviews
Workplace
Length of Stay
Therapeutics
Farmers
Farms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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“The Only Thing I Wish I Could Change Is That They Treat Us Like People and Not Like Animals” : Injury and Discrimination Among Latino Farmworkers. / Snipes, Shedra Amy; Cooper, Sharon P.; Shipp, Eva M.

In: Journal of Agromedicine, Vol. 22, No. 1, 02.01.2017, p. 36-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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