The overlooked role of deficit or non-productive behaviors in traditional assessment of long-term care residents

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Most instruments that examine long-term care residents' problem behavior assess only productive behaviors that require immediate behavioral management (e.g., kicking, wandering, screaming). However, it was hypothesized that the deficit or non-productive problem behaviors of older adults in long-term care (e.g., social withdrawal, excessive sleeping, and not eating) may be as problematic as their more salient counterparts. A factor analysis of 561 staff members' ratings of residents on the Nursing Home Problem Behavior Scale, along with three additionally constructed items, suggests that deficit behaviors can be assessed reliably and that they account for a unique, underlying dimension in problem behavior. After controlling for level of burnout, caregivers associated more unfavorable attitudes with residents' deficit, than with certain productive (e.g., irrational and annoying), behaviors. Recommendations are made to include deficit behaviors in traditional measures of problem behavior and to help professionals in long-term care become cognizant of their potentially negative impact upon caregiving.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-37
Number of pages19
JournalClinical Gerontologist
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 28 2006

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Long-Term Care
deficit
resident
Nursing Homes
Caregivers
Statistical Factor Analysis
Eating
Problem Behavior
burnout
caregiving
nursing home
eating behavior
withdrawal
caregiver
factor analysis
rating
staff
management

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aging

Cite this

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