The Pan-University Network for Global Health

Framework for collaboration and review of global health needs

Margaret Susan Winchester, Rhonda Belue, T. Oni, U. Wittwer-Backofen, D. Deobagkar, H. Onya, T. A. Samuels, Stephen Augustus Matthews, C. Stone, C. Airhihenbuwa

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the current United Nations efforts to plan for post 2015-Millennium Development Goals, global partnership to address non-communicable diseases (NCDs) has become a critical goal to effectively respond to the complex global challenges of which inequity in health remains a persistent challenge. Building capacity in terms of well-equipped local researchers and service providers is a key to bridging the inequity in global health. Launched by Penn State University in 2014, the Pan University Network for Global Health responds to this need by bridging researchers at more than 10 universities across the globe. In this paper we outline our framework for international and interdisciplinary collaboration, as well the rationale for our research areas, including a review of these two themes. After its initial meeting, the network has established two central thematic priorities: 1) urbanization and health and 2) the intersection of infectious diseases and NCDs. The urban population in the global south will nearly double in 25 years (approx. 2 billion today to over 3.5 billion by 2040). Urban population growth will have a direct impact on global health, and this growth will be burdened with uneven development and the persistence of urban spatial inequality, including health disparities. The NCD burden, which includes conditions such as hypertension, stroke, and diabetes, is outstripping infectious disease in countries in the global south that are considered to be disproportionately burdened by infectious diseases. Addressing these two priorities demands an interdisciplinary and multi-institutional model to stimulate innovation and synergy that will influence the overall framing of research questions as well as the integration and coordination of research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number13
JournalGlobalization and Health
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 21 2016

Fingerprint

Communicable Diseases
Urban Population
Health
Urban Renewal
Research
Research Personnel
Capacity Building
Urbanization
United Nations
Population Growth
Stroke
Hypertension
Growth
Global Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Winchester, M. S., Belue, R., Oni, T., Wittwer-Backofen, U., Deobagkar, D., Onya, H., ... Airhihenbuwa, C. (2016). The Pan-University Network for Global Health: Framework for collaboration and review of global health needs. Globalization and Health, 12(1), [13]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12992-016-0151-2
Winchester, Margaret Susan ; Belue, Rhonda ; Oni, T. ; Wittwer-Backofen, U. ; Deobagkar, D. ; Onya, H. ; Samuels, T. A. ; Matthews, Stephen Augustus ; Stone, C. ; Airhihenbuwa, C. / The Pan-University Network for Global Health : Framework for collaboration and review of global health needs. In: Globalization and Health. 2016 ; Vol. 12, No. 1.
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Winchester, MS, Belue, R, Oni, T, Wittwer-Backofen, U, Deobagkar, D, Onya, H, Samuels, TA, Matthews, SA, Stone, C & Airhihenbuwa, C 2016, 'The Pan-University Network for Global Health: Framework for collaboration and review of global health needs', Globalization and Health, vol. 12, no. 1, 13. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12992-016-0151-2

The Pan-University Network for Global Health : Framework for collaboration and review of global health needs. / Winchester, Margaret Susan; Belue, Rhonda; Oni, T.; Wittwer-Backofen, U.; Deobagkar, D.; Onya, H.; Samuels, T. A.; Matthews, Stephen Augustus; Stone, C.; Airhihenbuwa, C.

In: Globalization and Health, Vol. 12, No. 1, 13, 21.04.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Winchester, Margaret Susan

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AU - Oni, T.

AU - Wittwer-Backofen, U.

AU - Deobagkar, D.

AU - Onya, H.

AU - Samuels, T. A.

AU - Matthews, Stephen Augustus

AU - Stone, C.

AU - Airhihenbuwa, C.

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N2 - In the current United Nations efforts to plan for post 2015-Millennium Development Goals, global partnership to address non-communicable diseases (NCDs) has become a critical goal to effectively respond to the complex global challenges of which inequity in health remains a persistent challenge. Building capacity in terms of well-equipped local researchers and service providers is a key to bridging the inequity in global health. Launched by Penn State University in 2014, the Pan University Network for Global Health responds to this need by bridging researchers at more than 10 universities across the globe. In this paper we outline our framework for international and interdisciplinary collaboration, as well the rationale for our research areas, including a review of these two themes. After its initial meeting, the network has established two central thematic priorities: 1) urbanization and health and 2) the intersection of infectious diseases and NCDs. The urban population in the global south will nearly double in 25 years (approx. 2 billion today to over 3.5 billion by 2040). Urban population growth will have a direct impact on global health, and this growth will be burdened with uneven development and the persistence of urban spatial inequality, including health disparities. The NCD burden, which includes conditions such as hypertension, stroke, and diabetes, is outstripping infectious disease in countries in the global south that are considered to be disproportionately burdened by infectious diseases. Addressing these two priorities demands an interdisciplinary and multi-institutional model to stimulate innovation and synergy that will influence the overall framing of research questions as well as the integration and coordination of research.

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