The pastoral voice in John Dickinson’s first Letter from a Farmer in Pennsylvania

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

John Dickinson’s famed Letter appropriates pastoral design and convention for rhetorical ends. Through a close reading of the text, we can discern the ways in which literary idiom lends its force of expression to meet the needs of public controversy. A standard of rhetorical judgment emerges from the text which is both instantiated in the argument and is its chief mode of appeal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-57
Number of pages12
JournalQuarterly Journal of Speech
Volume76
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

Fingerprint

farmer
appeal
Farmers
Rhetoric
Letters
Idioms
Close Reading

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Education

Cite this

@article{03783fc878c3425dae4de8901f40eb20,
title = "The pastoral voice in John Dickinson’s first Letter from a Farmer in Pennsylvania",
abstract = "John Dickinson’s famed Letter appropriates pastoral design and convention for rhetorical ends. Through a close reading of the text, we can discern the ways in which literary idiom lends its force of expression to meet the needs of public controversy. A standard of rhetorical judgment emerges from the text which is both instantiated in the argument and is its chief mode of appeal.",
author = "Browne, {Stephen Howard}",
year = "1990",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/00335639009383899",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "76",
pages = "46--57",
journal = "Quarterly Journal of Speech",
issn = "0033-5630",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

The pastoral voice in John Dickinson’s first Letter from a Farmer in Pennsylvania. / Browne, Stephen Howard.

In: Quarterly Journal of Speech, Vol. 76, No. 1, 01.01.1990, p. 46-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The pastoral voice in John Dickinson’s first Letter from a Farmer in Pennsylvania

AU - Browne, Stephen Howard

PY - 1990/1/1

Y1 - 1990/1/1

N2 - John Dickinson’s famed Letter appropriates pastoral design and convention for rhetorical ends. Through a close reading of the text, we can discern the ways in which literary idiom lends its force of expression to meet the needs of public controversy. A standard of rhetorical judgment emerges from the text which is both instantiated in the argument and is its chief mode of appeal.

AB - John Dickinson’s famed Letter appropriates pastoral design and convention for rhetorical ends. Through a close reading of the text, we can discern the ways in which literary idiom lends its force of expression to meet the needs of public controversy. A standard of rhetorical judgment emerges from the text which is both instantiated in the argument and is its chief mode of appeal.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=74549199056&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=74549199056&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/00335639009383899

DO - 10.1080/00335639009383899

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:74549199056

VL - 76

SP - 46

EP - 57

JO - Quarterly Journal of Speech

JF - Quarterly Journal of Speech

SN - 0033-5630

IS - 1

ER -