The poetics of displacement: Self-translation among contemporary Russian-American poets

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article explores the practice of self-translation by two bilingual Russian-American poets, Andrey Gritsman and Katia Kapovich. A close reading of some of their self-translated texts elucidates the idiosyncratic nature of self-translation and its poetics of displacement. For both Gritsman and Kapovich, translating their own work becomes a means of exploring the mutation of the self through time, migration, and changing linguistic and cultural environments. A significant difference between the two authors concerns the way in which they present their poems. Gritsman invites a comparison between source and target text and the gaps between them in a bilingual en face edition, whereas Kapovich camouflages her self-translated poems as English originals. In spite of the different staging and performance of self-translation, both poets–by stressing difference rather than similarity in translation–turn their self-translated texts into a metacommentary on their own shifting transnational identities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-138
Number of pages17
JournalTranslation Studies
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 4 2018

Fingerprint

writer
staging
edition
migration
linguistics
performance
Poetics
Self-translation
American Poet
Poem
time
Transnational Identities
Translating
Cultural Environment
Camouflage
Close Reading
Mutation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

@article{936632e82eb841319942c672085b6f85,
title = "The poetics of displacement: Self-translation among contemporary Russian-American poets",
abstract = "This article explores the practice of self-translation by two bilingual Russian-American poets, Andrey Gritsman and Katia Kapovich. A close reading of some of their self-translated texts elucidates the idiosyncratic nature of self-translation and its poetics of displacement. For both Gritsman and Kapovich, translating their own work becomes a means of exploring the mutation of the self through time, migration, and changing linguistic and cultural environments. A significant difference between the two authors concerns the way in which they present their poems. Gritsman invites a comparison between source and target text and the gaps between them in a bilingual en face edition, whereas Kapovich camouflages her self-translated poems as English originals. In spite of the different staging and performance of self-translation, both poets–by stressing difference rather than similarity in translation–turn their self-translated texts into a metacommentary on their own shifting transnational identities.",
author = "Adrian Wanner",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1080/14781700.2017.1336641",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "122--138",
journal = "Translation Studies",
issn = "1478-1700",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

The poetics of displacement : Self-translation among contemporary Russian-American poets. / Wanner, Adrian.

In: Translation Studies, Vol. 11, No. 2, 04.05.2018, p. 122-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The poetics of displacement

T2 - Self-translation among contemporary Russian-American poets

AU - Wanner, Adrian

PY - 2018/5/4

Y1 - 2018/5/4

N2 - This article explores the practice of self-translation by two bilingual Russian-American poets, Andrey Gritsman and Katia Kapovich. A close reading of some of their self-translated texts elucidates the idiosyncratic nature of self-translation and its poetics of displacement. For both Gritsman and Kapovich, translating their own work becomes a means of exploring the mutation of the self through time, migration, and changing linguistic and cultural environments. A significant difference between the two authors concerns the way in which they present their poems. Gritsman invites a comparison between source and target text and the gaps between them in a bilingual en face edition, whereas Kapovich camouflages her self-translated poems as English originals. In spite of the different staging and performance of self-translation, both poets–by stressing difference rather than similarity in translation–turn their self-translated texts into a metacommentary on their own shifting transnational identities.

AB - This article explores the practice of self-translation by two bilingual Russian-American poets, Andrey Gritsman and Katia Kapovich. A close reading of some of their self-translated texts elucidates the idiosyncratic nature of self-translation and its poetics of displacement. For both Gritsman and Kapovich, translating their own work becomes a means of exploring the mutation of the self through time, migration, and changing linguistic and cultural environments. A significant difference between the two authors concerns the way in which they present their poems. Gritsman invites a comparison between source and target text and the gaps between them in a bilingual en face edition, whereas Kapovich camouflages her self-translated poems as English originals. In spite of the different staging and performance of self-translation, both poets–by stressing difference rather than similarity in translation–turn their self-translated texts into a metacommentary on their own shifting transnational identities.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85026367547&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85026367547&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/14781700.2017.1336641

DO - 10.1080/14781700.2017.1336641

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85026367547

VL - 11

SP - 122

EP - 138

JO - Translation Studies

JF - Translation Studies

SN - 1478-1700

IS - 2

ER -