The policing of race mixing: The place of biopower within the history of racisms

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper I investigate a largely untold chapter in the history of race thinking in Northern Europe and North America: the transition from the form of racism that was used to justify a race-based system of slavery to the medicalising racism which called for segregation, apartheid, eugenics, and, eventually, sterilization and the holocaust. In constructing this history I will employ the notion of biopower introduced by Michel Foucault. Foucault's account of biopower has received a great deal of attention recently, but because what he actually has to say about race tends to be vague and radically incomplete, many race theorists have been critical of his contribution. However, even if the account of the holocaust in terms of biopower is incomplete, there is still a great deal to be learned from Foucault's identification of this biologizing, or medicalising racism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-216
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Bioethical Inquiry
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 21 2010

Fingerprint

biotechnology policy
Racism
History
Holocaust
racism
history
North America
Slavery
Eugenics
Northern Europe
slavery
apartheid
segregation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

@article{7dd5d36e2013419093d4b48ef79478ff,
title = "The policing of race mixing: The place of biopower within the history of racisms",
abstract = "In this paper I investigate a largely untold chapter in the history of race thinking in Northern Europe and North America: the transition from the form of racism that was used to justify a race-based system of slavery to the medicalising racism which called for segregation, apartheid, eugenics, and, eventually, sterilization and the holocaust. In constructing this history I will employ the notion of biopower introduced by Michel Foucault. Foucault's account of biopower has received a great deal of attention recently, but because what he actually has to say about race tends to be vague and radically incomplete, many race theorists have been critical of his contribution. However, even if the account of the holocaust in terms of biopower is incomplete, there is still a great deal to be learned from Foucault's identification of this biologizing, or medicalising racism.",
author = "Bernasconi, {Robert Lambert}",
year = "2010",
month = "4",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1007/s11673-010-9224-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "205--216",
journal = "Journal of Bioethical Inquiry",
issn = "1176-7529",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "2",

}

The policing of race mixing : The place of biopower within the history of racisms. / Bernasconi, Robert Lambert.

In: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry, Vol. 7, No. 2, 21.04.2010, p. 205-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The policing of race mixing

T2 - The place of biopower within the history of racisms

AU - Bernasconi, Robert Lambert

PY - 2010/4/21

Y1 - 2010/4/21

N2 - In this paper I investigate a largely untold chapter in the history of race thinking in Northern Europe and North America: the transition from the form of racism that was used to justify a race-based system of slavery to the medicalising racism which called for segregation, apartheid, eugenics, and, eventually, sterilization and the holocaust. In constructing this history I will employ the notion of biopower introduced by Michel Foucault. Foucault's account of biopower has received a great deal of attention recently, but because what he actually has to say about race tends to be vague and radically incomplete, many race theorists have been critical of his contribution. However, even if the account of the holocaust in terms of biopower is incomplete, there is still a great deal to be learned from Foucault's identification of this biologizing, or medicalising racism.

AB - In this paper I investigate a largely untold chapter in the history of race thinking in Northern Europe and North America: the transition from the form of racism that was used to justify a race-based system of slavery to the medicalising racism which called for segregation, apartheid, eugenics, and, eventually, sterilization and the holocaust. In constructing this history I will employ the notion of biopower introduced by Michel Foucault. Foucault's account of biopower has received a great deal of attention recently, but because what he actually has to say about race tends to be vague and radically incomplete, many race theorists have been critical of his contribution. However, even if the account of the holocaust in terms of biopower is incomplete, there is still a great deal to be learned from Foucault's identification of this biologizing, or medicalising racism.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77952586092&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77952586092&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11673-010-9224-8

DO - 10.1007/s11673-010-9224-8

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:77952586092

VL - 7

SP - 205

EP - 216

JO - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry

JF - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry

SN - 1176-7529

IS - 2

ER -