The potential of video feedback interventions to improve parent-child interaction skills in parents with intellectual disability

Catherine M. Hamby, Erika Sell Lunkenheimer, Philip A. Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Parents with intellectual disability (ID) comprise a vulnerable population commonly in need of parenting support. Many parents with ID may struggle to engage in sensitive and responsive parent-child interactions due to cognitive, social, and economic challenges. Despite a large body of literature discussing parenting by people with ID, there is a concerning lack of evidence-based training programs targeting parent-child interaction skills in this population. As a growing number of parents with ID are referred for social and protective services, innovation is needed to support this group of parents. Video feedback (VF) interventions, in which parents view themselves engaging in positive, naturally-occurring interactions with their children under the guidance of a therapeutic coach, may fill this need. Here, we review challenges posed to many parents with ID, particularly those related to social information processing. We then describe key characteristics of VF interventions, explain how these characteristics accentuate the strengths and accommodate the challenges of parents with ID, and discuss population-specific adaptations of existing VF programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number104395
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume105
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

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Intellectual Disability
parents
video
Parents
disability
interaction
Parenting
Child Guidance
Self-Help Groups
Vulnerable Populations
Disabled Persons
Social Work
Automatic Data Processing
Population
coach
information processing
Economics
training program
Education
innovation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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title = "The potential of video feedback interventions to improve parent-child interaction skills in parents with intellectual disability",
abstract = "Parents with intellectual disability (ID) comprise a vulnerable population commonly in need of parenting support. Many parents with ID may struggle to engage in sensitive and responsive parent-child interactions due to cognitive, social, and economic challenges. Despite a large body of literature discussing parenting by people with ID, there is a concerning lack of evidence-based training programs targeting parent-child interaction skills in this population. As a growing number of parents with ID are referred for social and protective services, innovation is needed to support this group of parents. Video feedback (VF) interventions, in which parents view themselves engaging in positive, naturally-occurring interactions with their children under the guidance of a therapeutic coach, may fill this need. Here, we review challenges posed to many parents with ID, particularly those related to social information processing. We then describe key characteristics of VF interventions, explain how these characteristics accentuate the strengths and accommodate the challenges of parents with ID, and discuss population-specific adaptations of existing VF programs.",
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The potential of video feedback interventions to improve parent-child interaction skills in parents with intellectual disability. / Hamby, Catherine M.; Lunkenheimer, Erika Sell; Fisher, Philip A.

In: Children and Youth Services Review, Vol. 105, 104395, 01.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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AU - Lunkenheimer, Erika Sell

AU - Fisher, Philip A.

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N2 - Parents with intellectual disability (ID) comprise a vulnerable population commonly in need of parenting support. Many parents with ID may struggle to engage in sensitive and responsive parent-child interactions due to cognitive, social, and economic challenges. Despite a large body of literature discussing parenting by people with ID, there is a concerning lack of evidence-based training programs targeting parent-child interaction skills in this population. As a growing number of parents with ID are referred for social and protective services, innovation is needed to support this group of parents. Video feedback (VF) interventions, in which parents view themselves engaging in positive, naturally-occurring interactions with their children under the guidance of a therapeutic coach, may fill this need. Here, we review challenges posed to many parents with ID, particularly those related to social information processing. We then describe key characteristics of VF interventions, explain how these characteristics accentuate the strengths and accommodate the challenges of parents with ID, and discuss population-specific adaptations of existing VF programs.

AB - Parents with intellectual disability (ID) comprise a vulnerable population commonly in need of parenting support. Many parents with ID may struggle to engage in sensitive and responsive parent-child interactions due to cognitive, social, and economic challenges. Despite a large body of literature discussing parenting by people with ID, there is a concerning lack of evidence-based training programs targeting parent-child interaction skills in this population. As a growing number of parents with ID are referred for social and protective services, innovation is needed to support this group of parents. Video feedback (VF) interventions, in which parents view themselves engaging in positive, naturally-occurring interactions with their children under the guidance of a therapeutic coach, may fill this need. Here, we review challenges posed to many parents with ID, particularly those related to social information processing. We then describe key characteristics of VF interventions, explain how these characteristics accentuate the strengths and accommodate the challenges of parents with ID, and discuss population-specific adaptations of existing VF programs.

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