The pragmatic significance of “lost causes”: Reflections on Josiah Royce in light of William James and Edward Said

Vincent Colapietro, Josiah Royce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

While James suggested the pragmatic meaning of the Absolute is that the Absolute provides a warrant for taking, now and then, a “moral holiday,” Royce envisioned it to be a justification for fighting in behalf of “lost causes.” The battle of the Absolute as waged between these two thinkers was, in no small measure, one bearing upon the human significance and value of the Absolute, especially in reference to experience, time, and history. In the first part of this paper, the author examines Royce’s understanding of lost causes in its original polemical context, whereas in the second part he recontextualizes Royce’s position by juxtaposing it to that of the contemporary theorist Edward Said. Royce’s position needs to be understood in its original context but also invites being considered in a more contemporary one.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-299
Number of pages23
JournalTransactions of the Charles S Peirce Society
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Philosophy

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The pragmatic significance of “lost causes”: Reflections on Josiah Royce in light of William James and Edward Said'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this