The present state of neurointensivist training in the United States: A comparison to other critical care training programs

Evie G. Marcolini, David B. Seder, Jordan B. Bonomo, Thomas P. Bleck, J. Claude Hemphill, Lori Shutter, Fred Rincon, Shelly D. Timmons, Paulmdmph Nyquist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This manuscript describes the state of neurocritical care fellowship training, compares its written standards to those of other critical care fellowship programs, and discusses how programmatic oversight by the United Council for Neurological Subspecialties should evolve to meet American College of Graduate Medical Education standards. This review is a work product of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Neuroscience section and was reviewed and approved by the Council of the Society of Critical Care Medicine. Data Sources: We evaluated the published training criteria and requirements of American College of Graduate Medical Education Critical Care subspecialty fellowships programs of Internal Medicine, Surgery, and Anesthesia and compared them with the training criteria and required competencies for neurocritical care. Study Selection: We have reviewed the published training standards from American College of Graduate Medical Education as well as the United Council for Neurologic Subspecialties subspecialty training documents and clarified the definition and responsibilities of an intensivist with reference to the Leapfrog Group, the National Quality Forum, and the Joint Commission. Data Extraction: No data at present exist to test the concept of similarity across specialty fellowship critical care training programs. Data Synthesis: Neurocritical care training differs in its exposure to clinical entities that are directly associated to other critical care subspecialties. However, the core critical care knowledge, procedural skills, and competencies standards for neurocritical care appears to be similar with some important differences compared with American College of Graduate Medical Education critical care training programs. Conclusions: The United Council for Neurologic Subspecialties has developed a directed program development strategy to emulate American College of Graduate Medical Education standards with the goal to have standards that are similar or identical to American College of Graduate Medical Education standards. (Crit Care Med 2018; 46:307-315)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-315
Number of pages9
JournalCritical care medicine
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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