The Process of Classification in Prisons: A Descriptive Study of Staff Use of the System

Doris Layton MacKenzie, Robert A. Buchanan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The process of classification is examined in a southern U.S. prison system. Staff directly involved in classification activities in the seven prisons for males, one prison for females and the diagnostic center reported on their classification activities. Factors thought by staff to be important in classifying an offender, use of the diagnostic classification summary, and staff knowledge of the capabilities of other institutions in the system were examined. Staff perceptions of the importance and accuracy of different sources of information and the discrepancy between the two at initial classification and reclassification were used to develop hypotheses regarding possible changes to facilitate the classification process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-26
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Crime and Justice
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1990

Fingerprint

correctional institution
staff
diagnostic
source of information
offender

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Law

Cite this

MacKenzie, Doris Layton ; Buchanan, Robert A. / The Process of Classification in Prisons : A Descriptive Study of Staff Use of the System. In: Journal of Crime and Justice. 1990 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 1-26.
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The Process of Classification in Prisons : A Descriptive Study of Staff Use of the System. / MacKenzie, Doris Layton; Buchanan, Robert A.

In: Journal of Crime and Justice, Vol. 13, No. 1, 01.1990, p. 1-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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