The quality of sibling relationships and the development of social competence and behavioral control in aggressive children

Elizabeth A. Stormshak, Christina J. Bellanti, Karen L. Bierman, John D. Coie, Kenneth A. Dodge, Mark T. Greenberg, John E. Lochman, Robert J. McMahon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

To understand the relations between sibling interactions and the social adjustment of children with behavior problems, 53 aggressive 1st- and 2nd-grade children, their mothers, and their siblings were interviewed about positive and negative aspects of the sibling relationship. When conflict and warmth were considered together, 3 types of sibling dyads emerged: conflictual (high levels of conflict, low levels of warmth), involved (moderate levels of conflict and warmth), and supportive (low levels of conflict, high levels of warmth). On most measures of social adjustment at school, children in involved sibling relationships showed better adjustment than did children in conflictual relationships. Results are discussed in terms of a developmental model for at-risk children in which some sibling relationships may foster the development of social skills in addition to providing emotional support, which may enhance adjustment at school.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-89
Number of pages11
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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    Stormshak, E. A., Bellanti, C. J., Bierman, K. L., Coie, J. D., Dodge, K. A., Greenberg, M. T., Lochman, J. E., & McMahon, R. J. (1996). The quality of sibling relationships and the development of social competence and behavioral control in aggressive children. Developmental psychology, 32(1), 79-89. https://doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.32.1.79