The quick confusion scale in the ED: Comparison with the mini-mental state examination

J. Stephen Huff, Elana Farace, William J. Brady, John Kheir, Gregory Shawver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Quick Confusion Scale (QCS) is a 6-item battery of questions focusing on orientation, memory, and concentration weighted to yield a top score of 15. Analysis of the QCS compared with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) is needed to determine if the QCS is a valid marker of cognitive mental status. The MMSE and the QCS were administered to a convenience sample of 205 patients presenting to the emergency department. Exclusions included head trauma, multisystem trauma, Glasgow Coma Scale less than 15, non-English speaking, education level less than 8 years, contact or droplet isolation, acute illness, or incomplete data for reasons such as restricted patient access. Mean scores were 24.8(SD=4.7; range 2-30) on the MMSE and 11.89 (SD=3.5; range 0-15) on the QCS. QCS scores were significantly correlated (r=.783) with MMSE scores. The QCS appears comparable with the MMSE and is quicker to administer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-464
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Confusion
Glasgow Coma Scale
Craniocerebral Trauma
Hospital Emergency Service
Education
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Huff, J. Stephen ; Farace, Elana ; Brady, William J. ; Kheir, John ; Shawver, Gregory. / The quick confusion scale in the ED : Comparison with the mini-mental state examination. In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 19, No. 6. pp. 461-464.
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The quick confusion scale in the ED : Comparison with the mini-mental state examination. / Huff, J. Stephen; Farace, Elana; Brady, William J.; Kheir, John; Shawver, Gregory.

In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 6, 01.01.2001, p. 461-464.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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