The Race Is On: Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research Goes Global

Mindy C. DeRouen, Jennifer B. McCormick, Jason Owen-Smith, Christopher Thomas Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

More nations are joining the human embryonic stem cell (hESC) "race" by aggressively publishing in the peer-reviewed journals. Here we present data on the international use and distribution of hESC using a dataset taken from the primary research literature. We extracted these papers from a comprehensive dataset of articles using hESC and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). We find that the rate of publication by US-based authors is slowing in comparison to international labs, and then declines over the final year of the period 2008-2010. Non-US authors published more frequently and at a significantly higher rate, significantly increasing the number of their papers. In addition, international labs use a more diverse set of hESC lines and Obama-era additions are used more in non-US locations. Even considering the flood of new lines in the US and abroad, we see that researchers continue to rely on a few lines derived before the turn of the century. These data suggest "embargo" effects from restrictive policies on the US stem cell field. Over time, non-US labs have freely used lines on the US registries, while federally funded US scientists have been limited to using those lines approved by the NIH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1043-1047
Number of pages5
JournalStem Cell Reviews and Reports
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

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Stem Cell Research
Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Registries
Publications
Stem Cells
Research Personnel
Cell Line
Human Embryonic Stem Cells
Research
Datasets

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cell Biology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

DeRouen, Mindy C. ; McCormick, Jennifer B. ; Owen-Smith, Jason ; Scott, Christopher Thomas. / The Race Is On : Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research Goes Global. In: Stem Cell Reviews and Reports. 2012 ; Vol. 8, No. 4. pp. 1043-1047.
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The Race Is On : Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research Goes Global. / DeRouen, Mindy C.; McCormick, Jennifer B.; Owen-Smith, Jason; Scott, Christopher Thomas.

In: Stem Cell Reviews and Reports, Vol. 8, No. 4, 01.12.2012, p. 1043-1047.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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