The reactive-proactive aggression questionnaire: Differential correlates of reactive and proactive aggression in adolescent boys

Adrian Raine, Kenneth Dodge, Rolf Loeber, Lisa Gatzke-Kopp, Don Lynam, Chandra Reynolds, Magda Stouthamer-Loeber, Jianghong Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

792 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study reports the development of the Reactive-Proactive Aggression Questionnaire (RPQ), and the differential correlates of these two forms of aggression. Antisocial, psychosocial and personality measures were obtained at ages 7 and 16 years in schoolboys, while the RPQ was administered to 334 of the boys at age 16 years. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated a significant fit for a two-factor proactive-reactive model that replicated from one independent subsample to another. Proactive aggression was uniquely characterized at age 7 by initiation of fights, strong-arm tactics, delinquency, poor school motivation, poor peer relationships, single-parent status, psychosocial adversity, substance-abusing parents, and hyperactivity, and at age 16 by a psychopathic personality, blunted affect, delinquency, and serious violent offending. Reactive aggression was uniquely characterized at age 16 by impulsivity, hostility, social anxiety, lack of close friends, unusual perceptual experiences, and ideas of reference. Findings confirm and extend the differential correlates of proactive-reactive aggression, and demonstrate that this brief but reliable and valid self-report instrument can be used to assess proactive and reactive aggression in child and adolescent samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-171
Number of pages13
JournalAggressive Behavior
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

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