The Relation between Observational Measures of Social Problem Solving and Familial Antisocial Behavior: Genetic and Environmental Influences

Erica L. Spotts, Jenae Marie Neiderhiser, E. Mavis Hetherington, David Reiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Deficits in social problem-solving skills are often associated with antisocial behavior, particularly in children's extrafamilial relationships. The current study was designed to examine this association in several new ways: the association was examined at two times in an adolescent sample within the context of the family; genetic models were used to estimate genetic and environmental effects on observational measures of problem solving and antisocial behavior and on the association between the two. The analyses were conducted as part of the Nonshared Environment in Adolescent Development project, consisting of 720 families at Time 1 (mean adolescent age: 14.5 years) and 440 families at Time 2 (mean adolescent age: 16.1 years). Genetic influence was found for antisocial behavior, but not for problem solving. The findings of shared environmental influences on these measures and their association are unusual in the behavioral genetic literature and are important in that respect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-374
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume11
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001

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social problem
Social Problems
adolescent
Behavioral Genetics
Adolescent Development
Genetic Models
development project
respect
deficit
time

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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The Relation between Observational Measures of Social Problem Solving and Familial Antisocial Behavior : Genetic and Environmental Influences. / Spotts, Erica L.; Neiderhiser, Jenae Marie; Hetherington, E. Mavis; Reiss, David.

In: Journal of Research on Adolescence, Vol. 11, No. 4, 01.12.2001, p. 351-374.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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