The relations between emotional understanding, intellectual functioning, and disruptive behavior problems in elementary-school-aged children

Elizabeth T. Cook, Mark T. Greenberg, Carol A. Kusche

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined individual differences in children's emotional understanding and behavioral adjustment. Participants included 220 first- and secondgrade children (75% regular education, 25% special education) who were individually interviewed using the Kusche Affective Interview-Revised. Dependent measures of emotional understanding and experience included the ability to provide personal examples of 10 different emotions and the cues used for recognition of five emotions in oneself and other persons. Children were also administered the WISC-R Vocabulary, Block Design, and Coding subtests. One parent independently completed an Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist for each child. Results indicated that children who were rated as higher in behavior problems showed deficits in emotional understanding. Intellectual functioning was negatively associated with behavior problems and attenuated the effects of behavior problems on emotional understanding. Implications of the current findings for prevention and treatment programs for children with behavior problems are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-219
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 1994

Fingerprint

Child Behavior
Emotions
Social Adjustment
Special Education
Aptitude
Vocabulary
Checklist
Individuality
Cues
Problem Behavior
Interviews
Education
Therapeutics
Recognition (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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The relations between emotional understanding, intellectual functioning, and disruptive behavior problems in elementary-school-aged children. / Cook, Elizabeth T.; Greenberg, Mark T.; Kusche, Carol A.

In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Vol. 22, No. 2, 01.04.1994, p. 205-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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