The Relationship Between Co-Offending, Age, and Experience Using a Sample of Adult Burglary Offenders

Brendan Lantz, Richard Barry Ruback

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study uses a sample of adult offenders to examine the relationships among age, co-offending, and within-person changes in criminal experience. Methods: Burglary co-offending network data in one Pennsylvania county are analyzed to assess (1) the relationship between age and co-offending in a two-level framework, (2) the relationship between age and co-offender selection in a network regression model (MRQAP), and (3) within-person changes in experience and co-offending. Results: Age predicts co-offending: younger offenders co-offend most often, while older offenders co-offend least often. Moreover, as offenders gain experience, the number of co-offenders per offense significantly decreases. Within-person analyses indicate that the best model of the transition from co-offending to solo offending includes age, experience, and the interaction of age and experience. Importantly, the effects of experience in reducing co-offending are significantly greater for older than younger offenders. Conclusions: The results of the current study indicate that both age and experience must be included in future research on the transition from co-offending to solo-offending. The current study is limited to sentenced burglary offenders in one county. Future research should examine the effect of experience across offense types and across locations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)76-97
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

offender
experience
human being
offense
data network
regression
interaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Law
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

@article{59871ba0cea641f583fc8050de5e233a,
title = "The Relationship Between Co-Offending, Age, and Experience Using a Sample of Adult Burglary Offenders",
abstract = "Purpose: This study uses a sample of adult offenders to examine the relationships among age, co-offending, and within-person changes in criminal experience. Methods: Burglary co-offending network data in one Pennsylvania county are analyzed to assess (1) the relationship between age and co-offending in a two-level framework, (2) the relationship between age and co-offender selection in a network regression model (MRQAP), and (3) within-person changes in experience and co-offending. Results: Age predicts co-offending: younger offenders co-offend most often, while older offenders co-offend least often. Moreover, as offenders gain experience, the number of co-offenders per offense significantly decreases. Within-person analyses indicate that the best model of the transition from co-offending to solo offending includes age, experience, and the interaction of age and experience. Importantly, the effects of experience in reducing co-offending are significantly greater for older than younger offenders. Conclusions: The results of the current study indicate that both age and experience must be included in future research on the transition from co-offending to solo-offending. The current study is limited to sentenced burglary offenders in one county. Future research should examine the effect of experience across offense types and across locations.",
author = "Brendan Lantz and Ruback, {Richard Barry}",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s40865-016-0047-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "76--97",
journal = "Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology",
issn = "2199-4641",
publisher = "Springer International Publishing AG",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Relationship Between Co-Offending, Age, and Experience Using a Sample of Adult Burglary Offenders

AU - Lantz, Brendan

AU - Ruback, Richard Barry

PY - 2017/3/1

Y1 - 2017/3/1

N2 - Purpose: This study uses a sample of adult offenders to examine the relationships among age, co-offending, and within-person changes in criminal experience. Methods: Burglary co-offending network data in one Pennsylvania county are analyzed to assess (1) the relationship between age and co-offending in a two-level framework, (2) the relationship between age and co-offender selection in a network regression model (MRQAP), and (3) within-person changes in experience and co-offending. Results: Age predicts co-offending: younger offenders co-offend most often, while older offenders co-offend least often. Moreover, as offenders gain experience, the number of co-offenders per offense significantly decreases. Within-person analyses indicate that the best model of the transition from co-offending to solo offending includes age, experience, and the interaction of age and experience. Importantly, the effects of experience in reducing co-offending are significantly greater for older than younger offenders. Conclusions: The results of the current study indicate that both age and experience must be included in future research on the transition from co-offending to solo-offending. The current study is limited to sentenced burglary offenders in one county. Future research should examine the effect of experience across offense types and across locations.

AB - Purpose: This study uses a sample of adult offenders to examine the relationships among age, co-offending, and within-person changes in criminal experience. Methods: Burglary co-offending network data in one Pennsylvania county are analyzed to assess (1) the relationship between age and co-offending in a two-level framework, (2) the relationship between age and co-offender selection in a network regression model (MRQAP), and (3) within-person changes in experience and co-offending. Results: Age predicts co-offending: younger offenders co-offend most often, while older offenders co-offend least often. Moreover, as offenders gain experience, the number of co-offenders per offense significantly decreases. Within-person analyses indicate that the best model of the transition from co-offending to solo offending includes age, experience, and the interaction of age and experience. Importantly, the effects of experience in reducing co-offending are significantly greater for older than younger offenders. Conclusions: The results of the current study indicate that both age and experience must be included in future research on the transition from co-offending to solo-offending. The current study is limited to sentenced burglary offenders in one county. Future research should examine the effect of experience across offense types and across locations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85052051638&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85052051638&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s40865-016-0047-0

DO - 10.1007/s40865-016-0047-0

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 76

EP - 97

JO - Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology

JF - Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology

SN - 2199-4641

IS - 1

ER -