The relationship between executive functioning and dissociation

Amanda Schurle Bruce, William J. Ray, Jared M. Bruce, Peter Andrew Arnett, Richard Alan Carlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although dissociation by definition affects cognition, few studies have used neuropsychological measures to examine dissociative phenomena. This study compared 33 high and 32 low dissociators based on the Dissociative Experiences Scale, on self-report and neuropsychological measures of executive function, including the Dysexecutive Questionnaire, Iowa Gambling Task, Operation Span task, and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test-64. High dissociators endorsed significantly more executive difficulties than did low dissociators, but these difficulties were not related to their performance on neuropsychological measures. Results suggest that dissociative individuals' perceptions of executive impairments may be divorced from objective deficits, revealing an important process underlying the clinical manifestations of dissociation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)626-633
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2007

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Dissociative Disorders
Gambling
Divorce
Executive Function
Self Report
Cognition
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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The relationship between executive functioning and dissociation. / Bruce, Amanda Schurle; Ray, William J.; Bruce, Jared M.; Arnett, Peter Andrew; Carlson, Richard Alan.

In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, Vol. 29, No. 6, 01.08.2007, p. 626-633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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