The relationship between free-living daily physical activity and the severity of peripheral arterial occlusive disease

Debra J. Sieminski, Andrew W. Gardner

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106 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purposes of this study were to assess the magnitude of the reduction in free-living daily physical activity of claudicants compared with age- matched controls, and to examine the relationship between the severity of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and free-living daily physical activity. Eighty-five PAOD patients with intermittent claudication and 59 non-PAOD subjects with a resting ankle/brachial index (ABI) of 0.63 ± 0.20 and 1.21 ± 0.08, respectively, were monitored for 2 consecutive weekdays with an accelerometer and pedometer worn on each hip. The times to onset and to maximal claudication pain were also measured in the claudicants during a graded treadmill test to assess the functional limitations imposed by PAOD. The PAOD group had a 42% lower energy expenditure as measured from the accelerometer (357 ± 238 kcal/day versus 616 ± 363 kcal/day; p < 0.001) and a 45% lower pedometer reading (4737 ± 2712 steps/day versus 8672 ± 4235 steps/day; p < 0.001) than the non-PAOD group. Furthermore, the relationship between free-living daily physical activity and ABI in PAOD patients was significant for both the accelerometer (r = 0.41; p < 0.001) and the pedometer (r = 0.41; p < 0.001). The rate of decline in free-living daily activity was 42 kcal/day and 612 steps/day per 0.10 drop in ABI. The correlation between free-living daily physical activity and time to maximal claudication pain (6:25 ± 3:30 min:s) in the PAOD group was significant for both the accelerometer (r = 0.30; p = 0.05) and the pedometer (r = 0.36; p = 0.03). However, the time to onset of claudication pain (3:02 ± 2:22 min:s) in the PAOD group was not related to either the accelerometer (r= -0.02; p = 0.86) or the pedometer (r= 0.18; p = 0.28) activity values. In conclusion, free-living daily physical activity was 42% to 45% lower in PAOD patients with intermittent claudication than in apparently healthy subjects of similar age. Moreover, claudicants were progressively more sedentary with an increase in PAOD severity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-291
Number of pages6
JournalVascular Medicine
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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