The relationship between perceived discrimination and Generalized Anxiety Disorder among African Americans, Afro Caribbeans, and non-Hispanic Whites

Jose Angel Soto, Nana A. Dawson-Andoh, Rhonda Belue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined the relationship between frequency of race based and non-race based discrimination experiences and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) in a sample of 3570 African Americans, 1438 Afro Caribbeans, and 891 non-Hispanic Whites from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Because GAD and the experience of racial discrimination are both associated with symptoms of worry and tension, we expected race based discrimination to predict GAD prevalence for African Americans, but not other groups. We did not expect non-race based discrimination to predict GAD. Results showed that while more frequent experiences of non-race based discrimination predicted GAD for all groups, experiencing race based discrimination was associated with significantly higher odds of endorsing lifetime GAD for African Americans only. Results are interpreted in light of the different contexts that these three ethnic groups represent relative to their history within the United States as well as their present day circumstances.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)258-265
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

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Anxiety Disorders
African Americans
Racism
Ethnic Groups
History

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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The relationship between perceived discrimination and Generalized Anxiety Disorder among African Americans, Afro Caribbeans, and non-Hispanic Whites. / Soto, Jose Angel; Dawson-Andoh, Nana A.; Belue, Rhonda.

In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.03.2011, p. 258-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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