The relationship between reported problems falling asleep and cognition among african american elderly

Alyssa A. Gamaldo, Jason C. Allaire, Keith E. Whitfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between elders' cognitive performance and self-reported trouble falling asleep. Analyses were conducted on 174 older independently living, community dwelling African Americans (M age = 72.74; range = 65 to 90). Cognitive performance was measured using the Mini-Mental State Examination, Forward Digit Span task, Backward Digit Span task, Alpha Span task, and California Verbal Learning Test. Results suggested that individuals who reported trouble falling asleep tended to perform significantly worse than individuals who did not report trouble falling asleep on measures tapping short-term memory and working memory after controlling for age, education, gender, depression, and current health. These results demonstrate that a self-report of sleep difficulty may be a unique predictor of cognitive performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)752-767
Number of pages16
JournalResearch on Aging
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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