The relationship between traffic-related air pollution exposures and allostatic load score among youth with type 1 diabetes in the SEARCH cohort

Jessica A. Montresor-López, Stephanie R. Reading, Jeffrey D. Yanosky, Murray A. Mittleman, Ronny A. Bell, Tessa L. Crume, Dana Dabelea, Lawrence Dolan, Ralph B. D'Agostino, Santica M. Marcovina, Catherine Pihoker, Kristi Reynolds, Elaine Urbina, Angela D. Liese, Lesliam Quirós-Alcalá, J. Carson Smith, P. Jacob Bueno de Mesquita, Robin C. Puett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: We investigated the effects of chronic exposures to particulate and traffic-related air pollution on allostatic load (AL) score, a marker of cumulative biological risk, among youth with type 1 diabetes. Research design and methods: Participants were drawn from five clinical sites of the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth (SEARCH) study (n = 2338). Baseline questionnaires, anthropometric measures, and a fasting blood test were taken at a clinic visit between 2001 and 2005. AL was operationalized using 10 biomarkers reflecting cardiovascular, metabolic, and inflammatory risk. Annual residential exposures to PM2.5 and proximity to heavily-trafficked major roadways were estimated for each participant. Poisson regression models adjusted for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors were conducted for each exposure. Results: No significant associations were observed between exposures to PM2.5 or proximity to traffic and AL score, however analyses were suggestive of effect modification by race for residential distance to heavily-trafficked major roadways (p = 0.02). In stratified analyses, residing <100, 100-<200 and 200-<400 m compared to 400 m or more from heavily-trafficked major roadways was associated with 11%, 26% and 14% increases in AL score, respectively (95% CIs: -4, 29; 9, 45; −1, 30) for non-white participants compared to 6%, −2%, and −2% changes (95% CIs: -2, 15; −10, 7; −8, 6) for white participants. Conclusions: Among this population of youth with type 1 diabetes, we did not observe consistent relationships between chronic exposures to particulate and traffic-related air pollution and changes in AL score, however associations for traffic-related pollution exposures may differ by race/ethnicity and warrant further examination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number111075
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume197
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)

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