The relationship of childhood sexual abuse and depression with somatic symptoms and medical utilization

M. G. Newman, L. Clayton, A. Zuellig, L. Cashman, B. Arnow, R. Dea, C. B. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Previous research suggests that childhood sexual abuse is associated with high rates of retrospectively reported medical utilization and medical problems as an adult. The goal of this study was to determine if abused females have higher rates of medical utilization using self-report and objective measures, compared with non-abused females. A further goal was to determine whether findings of prior research would be replicated when childhood physical abuse level was controlled. This study also examined the moderating impact of depressed mood on current health measures in this population. Methods. Six hundred and eight women recruited from a health maintenance organization completed self-report measures of health symptoms for the previous month and doctor visits for the previous year. Objective doctor records over a 2 year period were examined for a subset of 136 of these women. Results. Results showed significantly more self-reported health symptoms and more self-reported doctor visits in abused participants compared with those who reported no childhood history of sexual abuse. Objective doctor visits demonstrated the same pattern with abused participants exhibiting more visits related to out-patient surgery and out-patient internal medicine. In addition, persons who were both sexually abused and depressed tended to visit the emergency room more frequently and to have more in-patient internal medicine and ophthalmology visits than sexually abused participants who reported low depressed mood and non-abused controls. Conclusions. These results replicate prior studies and suggest that current depression may moderate the relationship between sexual abuse and medical problems in adulthood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1063-1077
Number of pages15
JournalPsychological medicine
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2000

Fingerprint

Sex Offenses
Depression
Internal Medicine
Self Report
Health
Outpatients
Health Maintenance Organizations
Ophthalmology
Research
Hospital Emergency Service
Population
Medically Unexplained Symptoms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Newman, M. G. ; Clayton, L. ; Zuellig, A. ; Cashman, L. ; Arnow, B. ; Dea, R. ; Taylor, C. B. / The relationship of childhood sexual abuse and depression with somatic symptoms and medical utilization. In: Psychological medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 30, No. 5. pp. 1063-1077.
@article{e7b2a3ee7a30461791bc752497f703d6,
title = "The relationship of childhood sexual abuse and depression with somatic symptoms and medical utilization",
abstract = "Background. Previous research suggests that childhood sexual abuse is associated with high rates of retrospectively reported medical utilization and medical problems as an adult. The goal of this study was to determine if abused females have higher rates of medical utilization using self-report and objective measures, compared with non-abused females. A further goal was to determine whether findings of prior research would be replicated when childhood physical abuse level was controlled. This study also examined the moderating impact of depressed mood on current health measures in this population. Methods. Six hundred and eight women recruited from a health maintenance organization completed self-report measures of health symptoms for the previous month and doctor visits for the previous year. Objective doctor records over a 2 year period were examined for a subset of 136 of these women. Results. Results showed significantly more self-reported health symptoms and more self-reported doctor visits in abused participants compared with those who reported no childhood history of sexual abuse. Objective doctor visits demonstrated the same pattern with abused participants exhibiting more visits related to out-patient surgery and out-patient internal medicine. In addition, persons who were both sexually abused and depressed tended to visit the emergency room more frequently and to have more in-patient internal medicine and ophthalmology visits than sexually abused participants who reported low depressed mood and non-abused controls. Conclusions. These results replicate prior studies and suggest that current depression may moderate the relationship between sexual abuse and medical problems in adulthood.",
author = "Newman, {M. G.} and L. Clayton and A. Zuellig and L. Cashman and B. Arnow and R. Dea and Taylor, {C. B.}",
year = "2000",
month = "10",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1017/S003329179900272X",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "1063--1077",
journal = "Psychological Medicine",
issn = "0033-2917",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "5",

}

The relationship of childhood sexual abuse and depression with somatic symptoms and medical utilization. / Newman, M. G.; Clayton, L.; Zuellig, A.; Cashman, L.; Arnow, B.; Dea, R.; Taylor, C. B.

In: Psychological medicine, Vol. 30, No. 5, 03.10.2000, p. 1063-1077.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The relationship of childhood sexual abuse and depression with somatic symptoms and medical utilization

AU - Newman, M. G.

AU - Clayton, L.

AU - Zuellig, A.

AU - Cashman, L.

AU - Arnow, B.

AU - Dea, R.

AU - Taylor, C. B.

PY - 2000/10/3

Y1 - 2000/10/3

N2 - Background. Previous research suggests that childhood sexual abuse is associated with high rates of retrospectively reported medical utilization and medical problems as an adult. The goal of this study was to determine if abused females have higher rates of medical utilization using self-report and objective measures, compared with non-abused females. A further goal was to determine whether findings of prior research would be replicated when childhood physical abuse level was controlled. This study also examined the moderating impact of depressed mood on current health measures in this population. Methods. Six hundred and eight women recruited from a health maintenance organization completed self-report measures of health symptoms for the previous month and doctor visits for the previous year. Objective doctor records over a 2 year period were examined for a subset of 136 of these women. Results. Results showed significantly more self-reported health symptoms and more self-reported doctor visits in abused participants compared with those who reported no childhood history of sexual abuse. Objective doctor visits demonstrated the same pattern with abused participants exhibiting more visits related to out-patient surgery and out-patient internal medicine. In addition, persons who were both sexually abused and depressed tended to visit the emergency room more frequently and to have more in-patient internal medicine and ophthalmology visits than sexually abused participants who reported low depressed mood and non-abused controls. Conclusions. These results replicate prior studies and suggest that current depression may moderate the relationship between sexual abuse and medical problems in adulthood.

AB - Background. Previous research suggests that childhood sexual abuse is associated with high rates of retrospectively reported medical utilization and medical problems as an adult. The goal of this study was to determine if abused females have higher rates of medical utilization using self-report and objective measures, compared with non-abused females. A further goal was to determine whether findings of prior research would be replicated when childhood physical abuse level was controlled. This study also examined the moderating impact of depressed mood on current health measures in this population. Methods. Six hundred and eight women recruited from a health maintenance organization completed self-report measures of health symptoms for the previous month and doctor visits for the previous year. Objective doctor records over a 2 year period were examined for a subset of 136 of these women. Results. Results showed significantly more self-reported health symptoms and more self-reported doctor visits in abused participants compared with those who reported no childhood history of sexual abuse. Objective doctor visits demonstrated the same pattern with abused participants exhibiting more visits related to out-patient surgery and out-patient internal medicine. In addition, persons who were both sexually abused and depressed tended to visit the emergency room more frequently and to have more in-patient internal medicine and ophthalmology visits than sexually abused participants who reported low depressed mood and non-abused controls. Conclusions. These results replicate prior studies and suggest that current depression may moderate the relationship between sexual abuse and medical problems in adulthood.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033826250&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033826250&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S003329179900272X

DO - 10.1017/S003329179900272X

M3 - Article

C2 - 12027043

AN - SCOPUS:0033826250

VL - 30

SP - 1063

EP - 1077

JO - Psychological Medicine

JF - Psychological Medicine

SN - 0033-2917

IS - 5

ER -