The Relationship of Intimate Partner Aggression to Head Injury, Executive Functioning, and Intelligence

Sherry M. Walling, Jeffrey C. Meehan, Amy D. Marshall, Amy Holtzworth-Munroe, Casey T. Taft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Measures of head injury, executive functioning, and intelligence were given to a community sample composed of 102 male perpetrators of intimate partner aggression (IPA) and 62 nonaggressive men. A history of head injury and lower mean score on a measure of verbal intelligence were associated with the frequency of male-perpetrated physical IPA as reported by male perpetrators and their female partners. Lower mean scores on a measure of verbal intelligence also predicted frequency of psychological IPA perpetration. Using the perpetrator subtypes outlined by Holtzworth-Munroe et al. (2000), analyses revealed that compared with other groups, the most severely aggressive subtypes (i.e., borderline-dysphoric and generally violent-antisocial) were the most likely to report a history of head injury and to have significantly lower mean scores on a neuropsychological test of verbal intelligence. The possible role of neuropsychological factors in IPA perpetration and implications for prevention and intervention programs are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-485
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Marital and Family Therapy
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

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