The relationship of maternal work characteristics to childcare type and quality in rural communities

Allison De Marco, Ann C. Crouter, Lynne Vernon-Feagans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Drawing on data from the Family Life Project collected in North Carolina and Pennsylvania, this paper examines the relationship between maternal work characteristics and childcare type and quality in rural communities. Research is limited on the childcare experiences of rural families. Rural areas have less access to formal childcare and families often commute long distances for work, restricting childcare options. Employed mothers using childcare were selected (n441). Logistic and OLS regression was used to examine which characteristics, including workplace support, objective occupational measures, hours, wage, and shift, predicted care type and quality. Results indicated that most families were using informal care. Those with more hazardous work conditions and working night shifts were less likely to use centers. Higher quality care was related to more workplace support, center use, and higher wages. Implications for social policy and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-387
Number of pages19
JournalCommunity, Work and Family
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)

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