The relationship of organizational politics and support to work behaviors, attitudes, and stress

Russell Cropanzano, John C. Howes, Alicia Ann Grandey, Paul Toth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

446 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to report two studies that investigated the consequences of organizational politics and organizational support on two separate samples of employees. Study 1 surveys 69 full-time employees, while Study 2's sample includes 185 part-time workers. Four major findings were observed. First, the present studies replicated prior findings concerning the relationships of politics and support to such variables as withdrawal behaviors, turnover intentions, job satisfaction and organizational commitment. In general, politics is related to negative work outcomes while support is related to positive ones. Consistent results were obtained within both the full-and part-time samples. Second, we elaborated upon previous work concerning the relationship of politics and support to job involvement. Third, we found in both samples that politics and support did predict above and beyond each other, suggesting that they should be viewed as separate constructs rather than opposite ends of a single continuum. Lastly, Study 2 extended the research on politics and support by analyzing their relationships to four work stress variables: job tension, somatic tension, general fatigue, and burnout. Each of these four variables was predicted by both politics and support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-180
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Fingerprint

Politics
politics
employee
part-time worker
Job Satisfaction
burnout
Organizational politics
Organizational support
Work behavior
job satisfaction
turnover
fatigue
withdrawal
Fatigue
commitment
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Psychology(all)
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

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The relationship of organizational politics and support to work behaviors, attitudes, and stress. / Cropanzano, Russell; Howes, John C.; Grandey, Alicia Ann; Toth, Paul.

In: Journal of Organizational Behavior, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.01.1997, p. 159-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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