The relationship of positive work environments and workplace injury: Evidence from the National Nursing Assistant Survey

Deirdre McCaughey, Gwen McGhan, Erin M. Walsh, Cheryl Rathert, Rhonda Belue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: With estimates of a 51% growth in the number of nursing assistants needed by 2016, there is a critical need to examine workplace factors that negatively contribute to the recruitment and retention of nursing assistants. Studies have shown that high demands, physical stress, and chronic workforce shortages contribute to a working environment that fosters one of the highest workforce injury rates in the United States. Purposes: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between nursing assistant injury rates and key outcomes, such as job satisfaction and turnover intent, while exploring workplace environment factors, such as injury prevention training, supervisor support, and employee engagement, that can decrease the rates of workplace injury. Methodology/Approach: Data from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey were used to examine the negative effects of workplace injury on nursing assistants and the workplace environment factors that are related to the rate of worker injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-88
Number of pages14
JournalHealth Care Management Review
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Leadership and Management
  • Health Policy
  • Strategy and Management

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