The relative importance of distance in restricting international trade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Based on a general setup, this article shows that distance consistently accounts for about 40% of the international trade costs over the years for both developed and developing countries if we assume that trade costs take the iceberg form. The result helps us have a clear perspective of the relative importance of distance in restricting international trade.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1548-1552
Number of pages5
JournalApplied Economics Letters
Volume20
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

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Relative importance
International trade
Trade costs
Developing countries
Developed countries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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The relative importance of distance in restricting international trade. / Yang, Xuebing.

In: Applied Economics Letters, Vol. 20, No. 17, 01.11.2013, p. 1548-1552.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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