The reported influence of research participation on premarital relationships

Debra K. Hughes, Catherine Ann Surra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the reported influence of participation in research on individuals in premarital relationships. Data were from a larger longitudinal study of 60 dating couples. We designed a questionnaire to evaluate the effects of participation. Responses to open-ended questions revealed 3 major sources of influence: attention to relationship evaluation, effects on relationship activities, and indirect or no influence. Closed-ended items yielded 2 dimensions: relationship-defining influence and relationship-evaluating influence. Relationship-evaluating influence was greater the more respondents participated in the study. The higher were respondents' scores on relationship-evaluating influence, the more their relationship satisfaction increased over the year long study. We conclude that the effects of participating in the research are primarily educational and enriching in nature, rather than therapeutic as suggested in previous research (Rubin & Mitchell, 1976).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)822-832
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Marriage and Family
Volume62
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Hughes, Debra K. ; Surra, Catherine Ann. / The reported influence of research participation on premarital relationships. In: Journal of Marriage and Family. 2000 ; Vol. 62, No. 3. pp. 822-832.
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The reported influence of research participation on premarital relationships. / Hughes, Debra K.; Surra, Catherine Ann.

In: Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 62, No. 3, 01.01.2000, p. 822-832.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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