The rise and fall-and return-of the class rush: A study of a contested tradition

Simon Josef Bronner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The class rush or scrap involving a roughhouse public sporting competition is an American collegiate tradition that arose in the early nineteenth century. In this essay, the circumstances that led to the custom's rise and fall along with the ensuing controversies over the appropriateness of the tradition to student life are examined. Analysis of the traditions relevance to the construction of masculinity and adulthood applies social psychological concepts of "narcissism of minor differences" and "play frames".

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-67
Number of pages63
JournalWestern Folklore
Volume70
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology
  • History
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts

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