The role of Allee effects in gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), invasions

Patrick C. Tobin, Christelle Robinet, Derek M. Johnson, Stefanie L. Whitmire, Ottar N. Bjornstad, Andrew M. Liebhold

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Allee effects have been applied historically in efforts to understand the low-density population dynamics of rare and endangered species. Many biological invasions likewise experience the phenomenon of decreasing population growth rates at low population densities because most founding populations of introduced nonnative species occur at low densities. In range expansion of established species, the initial colonizers of habitat beyond the organism's current range are usually at low density, and thus could be subject to Allee dynamics. There has been consistent empirical and theoretical evidence demonstrating, and in some cases quantifying, the role of Allee dynamics in the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), invasion of North America. In this review, we examine the potential causes of the Allee effect in the gypsy moth and highlight the importance of mate-finding failure as a primary mechanism behind an Allee effect, while the degree to which generalist predators induce an Allee effect remains unclear. We then explore the role of Allee effects in the establishment and spread dynamics of the gypsy moth system, which conceptually could serve as a model system for understanding how Allee effects manifest themselves in the dynamics of biological invasions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-384
Number of pages12
JournalPopulation Ecology
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

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Allee effect
Lymantria dispar
moth
biological invasion
endangered species
population growth
population density
population dynamics
range expansion
rare species
introduced species
predators
generalist
organisms
habitats
predator
habitat

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Tobin, P. C., Robinet, C., Johnson, D. M., Whitmire, S. L., Bjornstad, O. N., & Liebhold, A. M. (2009). The role of Allee effects in gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), invasions. Population Ecology, 51(3), 373-384. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10144-009-0144-6
Tobin, Patrick C. ; Robinet, Christelle ; Johnson, Derek M. ; Whitmire, Stefanie L. ; Bjornstad, Ottar N. ; Liebhold, Andrew M. / The role of Allee effects in gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), invasions. In: Population Ecology. 2009 ; Vol. 51, No. 3. pp. 373-384.
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Tobin, PC, Robinet, C, Johnson, DM, Whitmire, SL, Bjornstad, ON & Liebhold, AM 2009, 'The role of Allee effects in gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), invasions', Population Ecology, vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 373-384. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10144-009-0144-6

The role of Allee effects in gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), invasions. / Tobin, Patrick C.; Robinet, Christelle; Johnson, Derek M.; Whitmire, Stefanie L.; Bjornstad, Ottar N.; Liebhold, Andrew M.

In: Population Ecology, Vol. 51, No. 3, 01.07.2009, p. 373-384.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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