The Role of Decision Influence and Team Performance in Member Self-Efficacy, Withdrawal, Satisfaction with the Leader, and Willingness to Return

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31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines team performance as a moderator of the relationship between decision influence and outcomes relevant to team effectiveness in hierarchical teams with distributed ex pertise. In this type of team staff members have unique roles and make recommendations to the team leader, who ultimately makes the team's final decisions. It is suggested that the positive rela tionship between decision influence and favorable outcomes (e.g., satisfaction) consistently described in the literature is dependent on team performance in this type of team. Specifically, team effec tiveness outcomes are proposed to be consistently more favorable in higher performing than in lower performing teams. Decision influence is proposed to relate positively to member satisfaction with the leader, willingness to return, and self-efficacy and to relate negatively to withdrawal in higher performing teams. The opposite pattern of relationships is expected in lower performing teams. A laboratory study was conducted with 228 undergradu ates performing a computer task as subordinates in 76 four-person teams with a confederate leader. The results generally support the hypotheses and illustrate a dilemma for leaders attempting to manage team effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-147
Number of pages26
JournalOrganizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
Volume84
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Self Efficacy
Willingness
Team performance
Self-efficacy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

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